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3 hours ago, JHCC said:

Before you do, please read this thread: A collection of improvised anvils

Thanks for that! I will try to find something better than what i have now but until then its gonna have to make due.

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Simply standing your chunk of rail on end will improve things immensely. You want as much steel directly under the hammer blow as possible, so using the flat end of the top of the rail as your working surface will put the entire length underneath that spot.

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My pleasure. We're all here to learn, and we're all here to teach.

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So i posted on Facebook to see if anyone had any Blacksmith’s stuff for sale and one of my dads hired men said to look at amazon and i saw this 

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I saw the link before it was deleted, and I wouldn't bother. You can make a better, more solid stand from scrap lumber, and have $200 left to spend on stock and fuel.

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I think I may have posted my Hill (1830-1850, according to AiA) before, but I thought I'd post it again. My excuse for re-posting is my relatively new stand. I had used a stump, but this one is an 8x12 beam I cut and doubled up.Beam was salvaged from a house remodel. I mis-measured the height, so I had to trim it down. I didn't have any reciprocating saw blades long enough to cut across, so my brother and I did it by hand. It was a lot of work. Also included is my process for removing the plywood base I put on the bottom. I thought it would help with stability, as I'd stand on the wood, and my weight would make a difference. Turns out it warped almost immediately and just made it rock more. Without anyone around to assist, I strapped it to a hand truck and used that for leverage. Last, I moved the horn to the right side. I'm right handed, but with the horn to the left, the off-side edge was pretty beat up, and it was hard to use it for drawing or bending. I prefer the horn to the left, but the anvil is better to use with it to the right. I guess I'll have get used to it on the left again if I ever get a new/better anvil.

hill anvil 1.jpg

hill anvil 2.jpg

hill anvil 3.jpg

stand-trim 1.jpg

stand-trim 2.jpg

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Lol. If I'd had one, I'd have used it.

After sawing through the stand with a crosscut saw, I saw that I had a limbing saw that would cut much more aggressively hanging on the wall. Not sure it would have been effective, as they're not really designed for this type of cut. And hopefully I don't have to do this again!

 

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I was informed of this one in a local pawn shop. I got it for $800. I think from what I can tell so far that it is a  200 lb. Peter Wright (134 stone weight). “SOLID WROUGHT” stamped in a circular pattern and and an anchor on each of the front feet ( horn side). I will submit the photos of the feet Soon.

6F3A2432-F54D-41DE-BAC1-922A80B1DE8B.jpeg

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939A8EB8-654D-492E-B817-2AA9C6581417.jpeg

0A169361-4AEF-445D-9669-31948B8D0D83.jpeg

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Now, I wasn"t out to fins a "London Pattern" Anvi. l I just wanted to find one of decent size to get started with. I began learning basics on one like this making leaves, roses, and nails.  I thought this style would suit me best. It was only after I bought it that I began learning about many more styles. BTW,  feel free to use this picture for a reference if possible.

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On 23/02/2018 at 4:59 AM, bajajoaquin said:

I didn't have any reciprocating saw blades long enough to cut across, so my brother and I did it by hand.

Joaquin ... that is the expression of determination :)

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5 hours ago, SHVTZHOT said:

I think from what I can tell so far that it is a  200 lb. Peter Wright (134 stone weight). “SOLID WROUGHT” stamped in a circular pattern and and an anchor on each of the front feet ( horn side).

Nice anvil SHVTZHOT, I have two PW. They are good workhorses. 

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Don't worry about the edges, mine have some damage on the edges too. Just use it as it is.

When you saved up some more money, you can buy yourself a german one :)

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It wasn’t so bad. Took an hour or so, but we changed out every time we got tired so it really only took about one beer each:)

SHVTZHOT, that anvil looks nice. Not too much sway and the near edge looks pretty clean still. 

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On 2/14/2018 at 4:43 PM, foundryguy said:

 I own a foundry, pour H13 often and have had dozens or requests over the past year for quality anvils. I am cutting a pattern for a 200 and 400 lb version now. 

200 and 400 lb anvils could certainly find favor with folks if the price is right.  Made in America, too?  That's really sweet to see.  On them, I'd prefer a double-horn anvil with upsetting block and clipping shelf.

Leaving the horn and cutting table soft means they aren't hardened and tempered like they main face is.  Since you're doing the whole thing in an oven, you'd have to go back and somehow spot anneal the horn and table.

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7 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

Don't think that alloy (H-13) will "spot anneal" very well.

And you really don't need to, anyway. Horns and steps were softer on older London-pattern anvils simply because the steel face didn't extend that far, not because there's an intrinsic advantage to those areas being softer. Any cutting can be done on a piece of scrap or a dedicated cutting plate.

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I have seen several videos of people “restoring” old anvils. Some heat the face plate after grinding and hard surface welding. I think (especially in my case being a learner), it would be best not to do this. I’m actually afraid to. I love the history it could have and I wouldn’t want to ruin any future possibilities with it.

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