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I Forge Iron

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Not done yet but this was cut from 4" plate. Horn was roughed with a O/A torch the finished with a 7" zircon flap disc. Feet cut separate and will be severely welded ;)

This is a 80# piece of drop from cutting a hole in a steel plate. No one said an anvil has to have the standard anvil shape.

140-lb pre-1910 Peter Wright. Aged, badly abused, and severely chipped, but no cracks or large chunks broken off. Stand fabbed from scrap angle, strap iron and some fresh 1" square tubing. Two "cutout

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A slant or slope isn't particularly useful or harmful or you could just tilt your anvil to the angle you like. If we're talking about swale, the dip some older anvils develop at or near the center of the face that can be used to help straighten work. Failing a little swale you can do well straightening over the hardy hole.

If the steel isn't trapped between the hammer and the anvil any moving it can do is bend. So, if you use a hammer near or even a little smaller than the hardy hole and strike over the hardy hole the work can't forge, it has to bend. A little practice and it works well.

Myself I like a wooden mallet over a wood block. The mallet used to live at a yard or garage sale as a wooden baseball bat. The wood block lived happily in our yard as part of a birch trunk. A mallet and wood block won't damage the texture or sharp details of hot work making it easy to straighten, curve, scroll, etc without messing it up. I've never gone to the extreme and say tried scrolling a long basket twist but years ago I tied a knot in a piece of rope twisted stock that came out tight and undamaged.

Frosty The Lucky.

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57 minutes ago, Frosty said:

A slant or slope isn't particularly useful or harmful or you could just tilt your anvil to the angle you like. If we're talking about swale, the dip some older anvils develop at or near the center of the face that can be used to help straighten work. Failing a little swale you can do well straightening over the hardy hole.

If the steel isn't trapped between the hammer and the anvil any moving it can do is bend. So, if you use a hammer near or even a little smaller than the hardy hole and strike over the hardy hole the work can't forge, it has to bend. A little practice and it works well.

Myself I like a wooden mallet over a wood block. The mallet used to live at a yard or garage sale as a wooden baseball bat. The wood block lived happily in our yard as part of a birch trunk. A mallet and wood block won't damage the texture or sharp details of hot work making it easy to straighten, curve, scroll, etc without messing it up. I've never gone to the extreme and say tried scrolling a long basket twist but years ago I tied a knot in a piece of rope twisted stock that came out tight and undamaged.

Frosty The Lucky.

Yes, it's a swale we're talking about. Nothing too serious, but certainly obvious that it's been a working tool and not just a conversation piece. It's otherwise in great condition given its age ... or any other measure. I'll certainly give thought to keeping a wooden block and mallet around as well. 

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5 hours ago, Patman said:

Here it is just picked it up today, fresh from the wire wheel with a coat of oil brought it inside for some pics better lighting.

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Love the idea of putting in the lounge room

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On 19/08/2016 at 8:56 PM, Frosty said:

A slant or slope isn't particularly useful or harmful or you could just tilt your anvil to the angle you like. If we're talking about swale, the dip some older anvils develop at or near the center of the face that can be used to help straighten work. Failing a little swale you can do well straightening over the hardy hole.

If the steel isn't trapped between the hammer and the anvil any moving it can do is bend. So, if you use a hammer near or even a little smaller than the hardy hole and strike over the hardy hole the work can't forge, it has to bend. A little practice and it works well.

Myself I like a wooden mallet over a wood block. The mallet used to live at a yard or garage sale as a wooden baseball bat. The wood block lived happily in our yard as part of a birch trunk. A mallet and wood block won't damage the texture or sharp details of hot work making it easy to straighten, curve, scroll, etc without messing it up. I've never gone to the extreme and say tried scrolling a long basket twist but years ago I tied a knot in a piece of rope twisted stock that came out tight and undamaged.

Frosty The Lucky.

Yes, it's a swale we're talking about. Nothing too serious, but certainly obvious that it's been a working tool and not just a conversation piece. It's otherwise in great condition given its age ... or any other measure. I'll certainly give thought to keeping a wooden block and mallet around as well. 

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On ‎8‎/‎21‎/‎2016 at 2:19 PM, Frosty said:

I love the idea of having a lounge in the shop for breaks and lunch. B)

There's plenty of life in that sorely abused old lady. What does a rebound test say?

Frosty The Lucky.

IT passed well was a 100%+ on rebound from one end to the other.

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9 hours ago, c.baum said:

400kg (about 880 lb) anvil from an old smithy in a salt mine

 

Ah c'mon! You're just trying to make us jealous!!! You could forge my anvil (75lbs) on that monster! And what a beautiful beast, too. 

I've been looking for a church windows anvil for a while, but have not found much! 

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What a beautiful BEAST!   I too would like to hear the tale of how you found it.   Was the smithy actually in the mine?   (There were a few like that in the USA back in the day---copper mines in Michigan IIRC; but more common on the surface.)

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@Kevin_Olson

the anvil face is about 195mmx890mm incl. horn. price see following story.

@ThomasPowers

Well, i'm a mining engineer in a former potash mine. The mine exists since 1895, and till 1990 it produced about 1.5 Mio tons potash a year. As you can imagine it is a pretty large mine, and so they had almost everything subsurface. So the smithy was subsurface too (2 coal forges, 2 anvils, a 165 lb air hammer) cause they made nearly every tool theirself. After the german reunification the mine was about to be closed completely. To cut a long story short they fortunately managed to build up a production of rock salt for road deicing. Nowadays where you can buy anything no one needs a smithy in a mine. And given that the smithy hasn't been used since 1990 the maintenance supervisor decided to dump the smithy full with salt. A good friend and coworker of mine heard of that and we could convince him to "sell" the anvils and the air hammer to me. I paid in summary about US$500 to the supervisor and the maintenance brigade could pay their christmas party. A good deal in my eyes ;)

 

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12 minutes ago, c.baum said:

@Kevin_Olson

" I paid in summary about US$500 to the supervisor and the maintenance brigade could pay their christmas party. A good deal in my eyes ;) "

 

I'd say more of a steal than a deal at that price! I'd love to get my hands on something like that! ....Then again, where would I put it? My work/storage/smithy area is a little crowded as it is! It's Beautiful piece of history, and a great treat to work on I'd imagine. Happy forging! 

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Yes I would consider that a good deal; excuse me while I pound my head on the desk, WHOMP, WHOMP, WHOMP!  I've been down in one of the old mines near Salzburg before; I have a degree in Geology and De Re Metallica is a well used book on my shelves.   

Now have you got the hammer back working? 

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Yep, good old russian quality made in 1978. Just replaced some sealing, new electric switches an so forth an the baby worked!! Most work was to build the foundation (my smithy is situated in the middle of a small village) and mounting the hammer on it (no possibility to lift it with a crane or so and it weighs 3.2 tons).

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C.BAUM....that anvil is possibly THE most beautiful thing I've ever seen on this site. Feel free to post more pictures...lots more...from all angles..

Add to that the power hammer, and you got the deal of a lifetime. CONGRATS

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