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Here Is my new sexy south german beast!!    I am far from normal and am abnormal excited about her sleek lines and excellent rebound!!!

The beer is a pint not a measly 12ozer!

I will post  more pictures in the show me your anvil section along with a rebound video (if I am smart enough to post a video )  it was Gooooooood !!!! 96%

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that is a sweetheart for sure.  I'll be looking forwards to what you come up with.  Love to see build photos too.   Have you decided layout of uprights and such yet? 

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I will be doing a 4 legged stand with the legs made from 4x4x1/2 tube mitered at a bias or diagonal.  1-1/4 top plate cut to the anvil base out line with a continuous 1/2 x 2 bar around the base to retain the anvil

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I dropped from 24" with a  7/8 ball bearing and it came back to almost 23"     witch I calculate to be 96% at it best spot. The worst spot was still 90%

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Ha ha ... also noticed that your southern german anvil has the two little corners at the start of the round horn. 

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Old Crew. Nice anvil for sure..  Have you done the test up the horn too? Most of the German anvils have the face plate to the tip of both horns.  I use a clear Acrylic tube the right size for the bearing. this way I don't have to chase the bearing.. :) some loss to friction probably. But when you hit a dead spot and there is nearly 0 bounce its really apparent. 

by the way that is a left handed anvil. That is so cool. :) 


Nice.  Marc1.. Ha, ha, ha.. that is funny. :)  

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Hello...

New to the site and hope to learn more about the art of metalworking. here is my anvil with the stand I just completed last weekend. All repurposed materials. Wood is from discarded pallets, railroad spikes from the tracks behind my parent's house and the hammer holders are the old U-bolts from my 1996 Ford F-350 PSD 4x4 when I added helper springs on the front end 22 years ago (yes I saved them that long)...

Thanks...Burgie

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I would put the hammer holders on the other sides as I often work right up to the stand.

Note: removal of RR spikes from RR property may be a felony where you are at; so we suggest not mentioning it on a public forum.  I have found that buying mine from my local scrapyard is a cost effective method of getting them when I need them.

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Thomas,

In doing some reading it is my understanding that, as a right handed person, I would position myself such that the horn of the anvil is to my right...

As far as the spikes, I called to local railroad office when I was back home visiting and they said if the spikes are not attached to the timbers and just laying on the ballast I could take them...

Nevertheless, I'll edit my posts and profile...

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Not only that, they are a pain to remove when you want to move the anvil to another base at some time in the future. I had to use an angle grinder to cut the heads off. 

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Burgie; the way you orient your anvil depends on what you are doing. If you are making rings you may orient it pointing towards you! (As is shown in a 130 year old smithing book.)

If you are using a hardy a lot you probably do NOT want your hardy hole to be under your hammer hand!

I have an anvil I have been known to flip over so I can dish into the indentation in the base.

There is no ONE RIGHT WAY to do it.  There are a whole lot of One Book Wonders claiming that though.

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Thomas,

Thanks for the feedback and, yes, totally get it about no single right way. There are always many roads you can take to get you to the same destination!!

Thanks again, Thomas!!

 

 

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Thomas makes some very good points.

If you have the anvil and stand loose so you can turn it then you can choose which ever way you need to.

Personally, I like my horn to the right and am right handed.

Traditionally the horn is opposite the handedness. Right to left and left towards right.

I spent about 10 years of the horn to my left and for making chain I still prefer it that way. 

But for nearly everything else I like it to the right.   this past year I did a competition making chain and it meant having to stand at the tip of the horn of efficient movement. 

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