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On 9/13/2019 at 1:27 PM, Sploing said:

It’s in the UK, I picked it up a few weeks back but haven’t had chance to clean it.  The bounce and ring are superb. There’s no way a set of bathroom scales would help, I’m a fairly big guy but I can’t lift it!  i had wondered what the little projection was for so thanks!

Well, I cleaned it up and there wasn’t a mark in sight. 

A plank, some scales and maths (thanks guys) showed it to weigh 360lbs or 3.0.24

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Sploing,  Looks like a carriage makers anvil. The side piece is used for making clips.  Nice anvil. 

Steven NY:  That is an early Trenton.  for some reason Trenton wanted to get into the anvil making business a few years before production in the USA,. and initially contracted with a German anvil MFG to forge and make the first series of anvils in Germany.   The way you can tell is the extremely well blended face (nearly no seam) a little bit different face/horn shape and lastly the foot both heel and toe have ledge on them and no cavity or concavity in the bottom of the anvil. 

They are a well forged anvil though they seem to have hard faces that chip on the corners.  i don't remember the date at which they started production in the USA, but the later ones which were made in the USA have a face you can see and a drop forged base made in a standard size for anvils weighing different amounts that was used for several sizes. Usually arc welded at the waist..  I love seeing the early examples of arc welding.. Pretty amazing to think lots of the technology was really at the turn of the century.  Arc welding, gas welding, water turbines, etc, etc. 

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Brand new to the forum.  Great information so far.  I look forward to browsing and learning.

I've wanted an anvil for many years.  I've missed a few good ones during the search.  My dad recently found a 129lb (126lb actual) Arm & Hammer in WV and I brought it back to SC with me.  I think it's in pretty good shape.  Solid all across the face, decent rebound, very little sway.  The face edges have some chips and the hardie hole has been a little abused.  I love the size and design, don't mind the condition, and I think with a little cleanup it will serve me well.    

It received many layers of various paints over the years so the first order of business was to sandblast it clean.  It was then coated it with linseed oil and dried in a powder coating oven.  I've been working on a design-as-I-go base for it.  I started with a piece of well seasoned WV red oak.  I have both ends of pretty well squared up and I decided to route an anvil base shaped recess in the top of the log.  The anvil fits well down into the ~1/2" deep recess and sits solid and I don't think it will walk around much.  I have lots of reshaping planned for the oak base later but my thoughts have now moved to anchoring the anvil down.  Because I'm working in a small space, I will be making a rolling base and worry a little that it could tip off the log if a roller were to hit something on the floor and stop suddenly.  For anchoring, I've had thoughts of drilling and tapping a single 5/8"-11 (or so) blind hole in the center of the bottom of the anvil base and use a length of threaded rod up through the center of the log to anchor the anvil.  I'll also use this threaded rod to attach the log/anvil to my rolling base.

I wanted to ask for some advice.

Is anchoring the anvil to the oak base even needed? 

Second question; is attempting to drill and tap into the anvil a dumb idea?

Thanks in advance.  I'm proud to own the anvil.  Here are some pictures:

Anvil Base 1.jpg

Anvil Base 3.jpg

Anvil Logo.jpg

Anvil Serial Number.jpg

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Welcome aboard... To me a rolling base is not very good because the anvil will move around when being hammered on. To move it a cheap HF hand truck will work as well and the base will be solid to the ground while working with it. Anchoring the anvil to the base is always a good idea, especially if it will be moved around. Doesn't have to be elaborate, I just forge some small spikes and drive them into the stump. Drilling and taping the bottom isn't a dumb idea, just more trouble than it's worth IMO. Now milling, grinding or welding on the anvils hardened face, that's a dumb idea for the average person. This is how I anchor my anvils.

100_1902.thumb.JPG.669a63de1ff21f9616b50b238fc0db01.JPG

100_1903.thumb.JPG.9b118653db7af4111948b03085f5ab9f.JPG

 

 

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Hello JLP,

Thank you for the feedback, that makes sense that is is an early Trenton made in Germany. The factory it was bought from was built by stone masons contracted from Germany by our towns name sake, Alfred Dolge. It does have some edge chipping as you said the face must be very hard. I have been using it for 10+ years now and I have no complaints. You can see the hammer marks from its production, impressive piece of work. 

I love the anvil stand on your new Fisher, and the anvil is great too of course. I love the fact that the person that mounted it took the time to taper the stand. 

Have a great night,

W

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Drilling and tapping the base would be a great theft deterrent as that is a fairly light anvil. Firmly attaching it to the base will help quiet the ring. (Using a non-quieted A&H will soon show you why so many folks like Fishers!)

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Thanks for the replies.     

I'm thinking the ring of the A&H may turn out to be a blessing in disguise.  I grew up on 550 acres in WV and for 15 years I've been way out of place living near the ocean in a subdivision.  I haven't really been able to adjust.  I figure this anvil ringing and a good WV coal fired forge may be just enough to push the neighbors and the HOA over the edge and help me get kicked out.  If I can make the wife some "real pretty" stuff with my new toys maybe she'll go with me.  :D

I'm excited to begin learning this skill.  Since joining the Navy straight out of high school and spending those years as a Hull Tech working with metal in so many ways, metal work has never gotten old to me.  

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PROTECT YOUR HEARING!  I've met a passel of smiths in their 80's and 90's with bad eyes and bad ears.  Life is much better, and CHEAPER, if you avoid such damage at a younger age!

Both issues are cumulative; so every little bit you can avoid HELPS!

Now a ringing anvil at a demo can help draw people over---especially places where they put the smith on the back side of yonder; but even there good earplugs will still allow you to talk with people and cut the damaging levels.

Getting neighbors/HOAs/Local FD or PD/etc upset with you is NEVER a good strategy.  Lure your wife away with positive rather than negative inducements!   (Only took one time with the villagers showing up with pitchforks and torches yelling "Kill the monster!" before I learned that lesson...

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The villagers showing up with pitchforks and torches, man i hate those nights. 

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Let ‘em come. I’ve got multiple fire extinguishers and more dangerous tools (agricultural and otherwise) than the rest of the neighborhood combined. 

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