Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 3.3k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Not done yet but this was cut from 4" plate. Horn was roughed with a O/A torch the finished with a 7" zircon flap disc. Feet cut separate and will be severely welded ;)

This is a 80# piece of drop from cutting a hole in a steel plate. No one said an anvil has to have the standard anvil shape.

140-lb pre-1910 Peter Wright. Aged, badly abused, and severely chipped, but no cracks or large chunks broken off. Stand fabbed from scrap angle, strap iron and some fresh 1" square tubing. Two "cutout

Posted Images

  • 3 weeks later...

Truth be told, it is in fact just a hidden piece of cut and weld modified railroad track :P
but thank you!
I've been thinking of making a bick but the only way to get the necessary size of material, would be a lucky find from the scrapyard or...forge welding a billet.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I find bull pins at the fleamarket; the truncated ones would do fine and are a lot  cheaper than the ones with the original long taper.

Leon stop by my smithy in a couple of weeks and I'll sell you one at my cost. (Usually US$ 3-5.)

Link to post
Share on other sites

There's nothing wrong with a rail anvil, J. I packed one with me on field jobs for years. I lent it to someone in the club probably 15 years ago and haven't seen it since. I filled the space between the web and flanges by welding rail cap into the space. Then I screwed up by welding a piece of 1" plate on top so I'd have a proper face. Still, even with a mildish steel face plate and a crude horn it served just fine for a 65lb. anvil. 

The shape or type anvil makes little real difference, once you develop the skills you can do virtually anything on the face though a bic comes in handy for things like arrow sockets.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just dug this old warhorse out of the rapidly deteriorating remains of my grandfather's old shed. Knowing Papa, he found it cheap somewhere back when they were still shoeing horses at the farm - which was before I was born. Mouseholes not pictured. Next step, a stand for it!

20190907_203719.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/4/2019 at 6:48 PM, J.Leon_Szesny said:

My "anvil" 
hmm does this count? :(
its not as fancy as a real anvil or as big or as heavy but I made it all by myself and I love it!...aaand eventually will get rid of the ugly hammer marks from missed beginner blows, yikes.

J.Leon, check out GS Tongs on youtube.  He has a similar, small but possibly heavier, anvil setup that he uses to make some quality stuff.  You don't need a "classical" London or German style anvil to have fun forging.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What Country is it in?  Looks like a UK coachmaker's anvil---the projecting piece on the side is for making all the clips needed in coachbuilding.

There were over 200 anvil makers in the UK and so without a marking it will be hard to find out which one did that anvil.  Doesn't matter; do the ring and ball bearing tests and if they pass you have a *good* anvil. A bathroom scale will provide the weight and we can even coach you on the CWT system if you want to stamp it that way!

Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s in the UK, I picked it up a few weeks back but haven’t had chance to clean it.

 

The bounce and ring are superb. There’s no way a set of bathroom scales would help, I’m a fairly big guy but I can’t lift it!

 

i had wondered what the little projection was for so thanks!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good idea.  But use the larger piece for your main anvil mounted vertically. You want as much mass directly underneath the blow of the hammer.  Even using a large (largest you can find) sledge hammer head on end will make a good hammering surface.  With the RR track on end, you not only have that larger surface from the face of the track, but you have some good 90 degree edges, though too sharp (but they can easily be relieved with a file........but not too much) to make your 90 degree bends.  You'll want those for example when you make tongs,.

Chris

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...