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8 hours ago, John McPherson said:

There was a very short-lived sit-com TV show called "When Things were Rotten".  

Ran for a half season in 1975. That and “Get Smart” were my first exposure to the genius of Mel Brooks. 

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1 hour ago, Lars_ said:

It's perfectly logical to restore a tool in a good to perfect condition if one has the mean to do so. This should not earn contempt or demand any justification.  

This sentence should stick to the top of the anvil section in my personal opinion :)

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No contempt or justification needed on my end. I only made light of the term "peasant" and that Trenton anvils are for " peasants". I own and use a Trenton that is solid  steel from the weist up and it serves me well. I would love a solid cast steel german pattern anvil around 200-300# but, again joking kind of, I can't afford one.

Obviously you know what you are doing. Mind sharing the process you went through to repair it to help others? 

Also, it has been asked how you restore an anvil, but you stated the sharper corners for what " you forge", what Do you forge/make? The statement is there on that you do what you do because of what you make. Im just curious in a learning manner. 

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Ok so noted not advised for anvils with face plates. How about the ones that are solid tool steel from the waist up? Or other solid cast steel anvils? Can you not share a method? I have a Hay Budden that is solid steel from the waist up that is minorly rough (chisel marks in the face) and rougher rounded edges. Can you share for that? Or if someone here found a solid cast steel german pattern? 

This site is really about sharing and learning. Yes, sometimes jokes happen to lighten the mood and yes, sometimes we get disagreed with but mainly learning and passing on what we know to others. So if you dont mind contributing to future generations, what is your method and what Did you learn from the gentleman that worked on making anvils?

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The Hay Budden in question has around 80% rebound where my trenton has higher 90%. The chisel marks (all over the face and horn) do not prevent me from forging nice things on it (so I have not messed with it) but are around 1mm deep here and there and mostly lighter. 

I would guess at the tool you mentio to be called a " milling machine?" To make cut it flat and smooth?

I do not know how far" deep" it is hardened, nor would I know a way to know.  I do appreciate you expanding on the method and would love to know more. 

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10 hours ago, John McPherson said:

A straight line is a terrible thing to waste. Just ask Frosty,

Did I miss a straight line John?:o I've only been skimming the thread.

Frosty The Lucky.

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That'd explain the miss. I started thin skimming when things got tetchy. The noise to signal ratio went south so I went elsewhere. There are folks I read no matter where they post so I had a little watch going.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Lol, I knew I'd hook someone with " the peasants are revolting" thought it'd be Frosty or Thomas but up stepped John for the win. Well done John, Well done. ;)

Glad to see more light hearted people jump in.

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So did you mill the top of the anvil to get it flat and smooth Lars?  Did you grind the edges to make them square?  Maybe I'm missing it somehow but I'm not really grasping just how you repaired this anvil based upon your posts..  Please give us a step by step on how you repaired the anvil if you don't mind.  I think maybe we could all learn something or maybe you have some methods that we don't use over here.  I think that's what folks are wanting to see posted.  The thread got a little off-track.  

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14 hours ago, Daswulf said:

" the peasants are revolting"

Only if they don't bathe often enough. Then again I live in a forest and have provincial views.

Frosty The Lucky.

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There's been times my wife says I smell like metal and leather after a heavy period of forging, so perhaps you are onto something Frosty:D

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On 8/19/2018 at 3:36 PM, Frosty said:

Only if they don't bathe often enough. Then again I live in a forest and have provincial views.

Frosty The Lucky.

I thought the comeback was "The peasants have always been revolting, but now they're rebelling!"

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I don't have it anymore, but I started out with a 2 foot piece of railroad track turned upside down wielded to a steel stand. It was awful to work as it bounced around even when secured, it couldn't have been more than 45 lbs. But I was 12 at the time and got it for free so I didn't complain. Now I've got 100 lbs Hay Budden that is a million times better to work on.     

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Welcome to IFI. If you haven't yet I always suggest this thread to get the best out of the forum.

https://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/48833-read-this-first/

That's the problem with RR track upside down, hence the suggestion to mount it vertical.

36 minutes ago, James Holden said:

it bounced around

 

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Aye ... A nye of pheasant can be a pleasant surprise for a peasant seeking an antepast for a pageant ... :)

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On 8/24/2018 at 9:07 AM, JHCC said:

A pagan pageant, perhaps?

Perhaps ... historically the archetype of a blacksmith in ancient folklore is pagan,

so a nye of purple pheasant offered in a philanthropic gesture for the plebs to  phagocyte in a pageant procession of confused pharisee ... would be certain to precipitate the perception of a phantom phenomenon of collective  and cacophonic philarmony ... :) 

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Marc1,

Let me hazard  a guess.  You graduated with a doctorate in dynamic obfuscation.

Am I close?

SLAG.

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More effectual than dynamic ... lets say paraphrasal obscurantism ... :P

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