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Show me your vise


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Well here are a few of the vises I use and my "Big" vises... There is a 4" in the pic with the 8" and 9" for scale.... The 9" is 215lbs... The one on the stand with the Wilton machinest vise is

just because someone will say "I have never seen a 9" post vise" This monster came from the Genva steel mill in Utah... 215lb, and yes 9" jaws... I know there are bigger vises out there but so

Just out of curiosity, Is there anyone out there that knows of another 9" or something bigger? Someday I am going to put this on a stand but its not really useful for me at the moment. Its jus

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Thanks for looking! One downside to using as a drill press vise is its weight. (probably 40#s or so) As I also have a Chinese made drill press ala "Horror Fright" it doesn't have the strongest table. It already has a little bit of flex when I drill larger holes or harder materials. I would want to support the table or even re-fabricate a stronger one; not really something I plan to add to the ever growing "list" LOL I do, however like Sask Mark's idea of the "third hand" which is sort of what I had in mind initially anyway. Perhaps a combo stand that could sit under the drill with the table swung out of the way and still be able to use as a stand-alone vise. For heavier clamping power, I still have my Wilton beast I posted earlier in this thread ;)

Scott

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I bought this one from a yard sale. It mounted on a railroad tie the inside of a metal can filled with busted concrete . then it filled with wet concrete. The base is a 2-10 pressure treated lumber with a piece of metal on top of that . It has four 8 in long lag bolt drilled into the railroad tie. It all shiny from a good spray of wd-40 .
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Next it my post vice that I bought at a local fleamarket. I brought it home last summer and wire brushed the rust off and tried to take the scew out but would come out so i left. me and my neighbor made a home stand for . I dediced to take it apart agion this summer and give it a good cleaning. Then the the screw and the box come out with out a fight. I used some brake cleaner to clean inside the holes and box. put it back togeither then hosed it down with wd-40.It did not come with a spring or the mont braket and the bolt for the pivit was missing.I left the handle red for i know where it is in my dark building.

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This is one of my favorites, a two inch jaw bench vise, but essentially made just like the early English leg vises. A number of small vises were made in Germany, but they usually have a plate covering the spring area, and they are later models than this one. The rule in the pic is 7" long.

I made the lower jamming handle, the spring(2" long), and reattached the underneath-bench washer. It came from eBay about 3 years ago.

post-74-0-13324300-1316273366_thumb.jpg

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This is my personal vise, a Peter Wright with 6 7/8" jaws. I haven't been on eBay for maybe 3 years, but this one came via eBay. It was missing its spring, U-shackle, mounting plate, wedge, and gib key. It took me a long day, and I was able to make those parts. It is mounted on a square timber.

Whoops. Forgot to put on the paper clip. See next page.

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The first Indian Chief vise that I saw was owned by a Taos Pueblo Indian shop teacher, Eliseo Concha, at Taos Pueblo, New Mexico! The conformation of the Indian Chiefs is the same as the Columbians which were made by the Columbus Forge and Iron Works in Columbus, Ohio.

I glimmed "Anvils in America" which says a litle about vises. Postman says that the Columbus Forge & Iron Works was associated with Trenton anvil manufacture. I think they also made vises in the early 1900's.

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i have a few vises some in good shape and one 6inch post vice that was used hard and left out side until i came across itpost-22808-0-50969100-1317935304_thumb.j
and a 5 3/4 incherpost-22808-0-07048900-1317935317_thumb.j
my 6incher mounted on 3 rims from a schoolbus and 4 blocks of 4x4 movable but relatively stablepost-22808-0-08813600-1317935329_thumb.j
just a nice little 4incher that i picked up its mounted on a piece of angle iron and some plate steel with one large bolt that ankers that back of the plate to the workbench and the front is held in the wood clamp so i can take it on and off if i need a flat space to work same with the small wire brushpost-22808-0-86197900-1317935341_thumb.j

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(copied from my thread)

Well after many hours scratching my head wondering where in the jumbled mess known as the shed it was hiding, I finally located the post vice I knew I had.
After stripping it down and disposing of a few 8 legged nasties the work began.
First i had to remove the front jaw, and strip back the pivot boss so it would move freely, i than sprayed it with SPS (Switch Plate Spray, used in the rail industry for lubricating pointwork, its a spray on powdered graphite)
than to clean up the old grease from the thread and box, easy done with a rag.
after looking at the old bolt it had as a handle i decided to make a new handle, an hour on the lathe and the end result is rather nice.
I than dunked the threaded section in a bucket of grease and re assembled the whole thing.

Its got 4.5" jaws and stands about 3' 7" tall
301648_2085712425720_1332428323_31823036

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anyone know the historical/technical reason for the collar-knob on the bottom of the post?

I'm assuming that it's supposed to be sunk into a piece of wood or metal but don't really see anyone bothering.....

People who don't bother are either lazy or ignorant of the proper way to install a leg vise. The peg on the bottom is supposed to be mounted into a hole in the floor. If you don't the vise will be a not very effective tool it will move around when you do any heavy work.
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Even my travel vise has a bottom plate to rest in/on that gets staked to the ground so I can give a good pull without the vise trying to turn sideways.

My 100 pound vise in my shop is resting on/in a large grader blade (dirt floor)

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Probably only a vise aficionado like me would go ape over this "transitional English leg vise." It appears to have elements of both the early composite, brazed vises (a tenon for attachment) and the later solid box vises. It has the conformation of a Peter Wright and has a 5 1/16" jaw width. It's possible that Peter Wright was able to make the solid box, but had not yet got to the wrap-around shackle, because ot its having the tenon and wedge.

Addendum. Sorry I was unable to attach a photo. I'll keep trying.

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I like the way that the center of that vise doesn't have the screw getting in the way of long pieces in it's jaws; I had to admonish some students not to pound on a piece resting on the screw cover of a vise last Sunday...

It doesn't do much for me save for being an oddity---I don't see myself converting any of the ones I already have to that style.

Thanks for showing it though; I bet Frank will get a kick out of it!

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