Glenn

Show me your vise

Recommended Posts

I see! If the top of the spring is anchored properly, the bottom will kick out and press against the movable jaw. Thank you, gentlemen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can buy a brand new one just like it today and they're NOT cheap. Excellent bench vises just do NOT hammer on them, they are NOT anvils nor do they play one on TV. Seriously, the anvil and horn shape on the rear aren't one. They must be an heirloom shape from the days when catalog sales carried one tool does it all blacksmith shops in a box. A picture of one was  posted here a couple days ago, well the "anvil" portion that is. Check out a Sears catalog from the beginning of the 20th. cent or earlier, every farm needed a blacksmith shop and Sears sold one that came in one multi purpose tool kit thingy.

Anyway, please don't take chances of damaging that fine vise. Keep an eye open for a heavy block of steel we'll help you set it up and learn to use it as an anvil. 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never hammer on it, I only use it for fairly light work like filing, sanding, or for bending rings for making chainmail. It's a joy to work with! The only thing I use the "anvil" section for is shaping thin copper sheets. Some owner before me must have hit the jaws a bit too hard and cracked off the casting supporting the rear jaw (you can see that it's missing in the photo).

This is what I use as an anvil:

 

001.thumb.JPG.53e035bc6184976ac2236e12cb72113e.JPG

 

003.thumb.JPG.5e6d23f12c46c1afea64231eb6756b31.JPG

 It's a piece of rail (I don't think it's from a normal train, it seems too small), and, ironically, the back of a vise. I got it for 20 dollars because it's missing the whole front jaw. The vise says on the side "Patented Sept 22, 1914". Here's what it originally looked like:

image.png.86a4bea4614b4cad69429ffb77cd35b8.png

I use the rail piece for most stuff, and then the vise for bending things (because it has a horn).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here’s mine. I picked it up at Quad State 2018. It’s an Indian Chief from Columbus Forge & Tool in 1903. I built the stand but the vise was in good clean shape when I got it. There must have been over 100 of them to choose from. A great place to shop.

42C69347-2745-4AFB-9242-1A2912A9F666.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great,

No weight

No jaw size

No length.

No price,

No nuttin'

It's a mystery.

SLAG.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, I thought this was ‘show me your vise’.

5-1/2” jaws

80 lb

either 17.5” or 41” post (not sure where to measure)

i paid $200 and think I did ok. In any event, I’m very pleased with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/15/2018 at 6:07 PM, Hibby said:

Here’s mine.

Very Nice, Hibby.  And by the way, very nice welds on that column splice, and the gussets - not your first rodeo, eh?

Here is my little Rock Island 625. Jaws 3" wide x 3" opening, $45 on that list thing. one lug broken off and re-attached by some previous individual, with some sort of copper-based braze. Poor execution, but pretty tough joint - so far. One can see the braze there adjacent to the swivel lock. Anvil Face, Horn, and Pritchel all highly functional within their rated capacity.

This tool really has to get around. Abrasive metal removal must be done out of doors - my call - and nothing to do with my love of working outside:rolleyes:. The goezintas are borrowed from another modular system that I built some 20 years ago, for hauling trees.

Indoors, the vise is secured well with those hammer-on clips. Limited space.  Everything at this job must be mobile and convertible.

Merry Christmas,

Robert Taylor

20181207_142529-800x600Resize.jpg

20181207_142550-800x600Resize.jpg

20181211_195150800x600Resize.jpg

20181211_195238800x600Resize.jpg

20181211_195337800x600Resize.jpg

20181211_195410800x600Resize.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Robert,

Nice set up.

Marry Christmas for You, Sheila, & all the gang.

SLAG, &  Marg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well after over a year without being able to forge, I finally started doing some driveway forging, so I set up my smaller vise to be easily moved. 4" jaws

IMG_20190127_123044321.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is my vise. I recently got it set up and back in working order. She should have a whole lot of life left in her.

picture.php?albumid=6761&pictureid=89905

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love it.. If you can put a rock or a block of wood under that angle bracket on the bottom..  

Few realize this, but the leg should be on the ground in a hole cut into the floor or on a special cast iron plate that was bolted to the floor.. 

The mounting bracket was to hold the vise, spring from twisting or rotating, but the leg/foot was to carry the weight of the vise and any force put onto it..  The mounting bracket was not designed to hold any weight or downward force.. 

On 12/28/2018 at 1:33 PM, Anachronist58 said:

Thanks Slag and JLP - Happy New Year!

Where did you find the slip fit tubing?  Or what sizes did you order to get the fit? 

Happy New Year to you and the Mrs too.. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jlpservicesinc said:



Few realize this, but the leg should be on the ground in a hole cut into the floor or on a special cast iron plate that was bolted to the floor.. 

 

So true.

I fabricated a stand out of some scraps I had to mount my post vise in my dirt floored shop. I'm only 6 feet tall and find post vises to high for comfortable hammering. I set them in the ground. Once the concrete cured I cut the leg pipe off at the ground and its as solid as a tree stump. 

IMG_3470.JPG

IMG_3471.JPG

IMG_3496.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vises were made with different heights and were mounted at different heights depending what they were used for.  A filing vise is at a different height than a pounding vise. As I have several postvises in my shop they are at different heights. (Note that the heights are based on the person using it so asking someone else what height their vise is at is of little value unless you both have identical builds. )  You can of course use a vise that is a bit off proper height for a project; but it's amazing how much nicer it is working with a vise at the proper height for You and what You are doing.  (I even have a small platform to stand on if I want to use one of my large vises for punching or drifting.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Make it to suit yourself. Plywood over a pallet is fairly moveable . You generally don't need a lot, I use several   wood 4x4"  drops.  More important is to remember that it's there when moving with the workpiece.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have tried that route at a previous shop. I have found one low and one high to be a much better solution for me.

Since my typing finger is warmed up, here is a bench vise you can beat on!

rock island vise.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.