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I Forge Iron
Arbalist

Show me your Bottle Openers!

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I've tried this a few times now and I think that I'll share this one. Still looks like crap but it's only my fourth one so I guess it's ok. Don't know how well it works seein as I don't have any pop tops to try it on. I do plan making a few more nicer/better lookin ones in the coming weeks so whenever I do get somethin better lookin I'll share it too. This one started as 3/16x3/4" and its idk how long cause I didn't measure it.

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Looks mighty fine, M.  I just made one similar and bent it 90º so I could mount it on a wall.  Lots of folks prefer that "primitive" look for their decor, and bending it to be a wall-mount piece kind of hides a lot of the little flaws that aggravate us as the makers.

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Thank, Vaughn. I still have a ways to go to make them look good and feel god in the hand. I haven't thought about making a wal mount version yet but might have to give it a go next time. I did make a couple more attempts this weekend one turned out ok and the other one not so much. I broke the ring on one I was making from 1/2" square but it's ok because it was a little on the long side so I'm goin to just cut the ring off and try forging it again.

 

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Edited by M Cochran

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Thanks, Josh. I thought the texture of the rebar could be nice so I had to find out. I tried to line up the ridge in the rebar with my tab but I messed up and let it roll a little and by the time I noticed it was too late. 

Hope you're trip was enjoyable and thanks again for your help Friday, don't hesitate to let me know when I can repay the favor.

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20150502_100835_zpssrokwi4s.jpg

 

Forged from a railroad spike I had laying around. Initially I had intended a person's finger to go through the ring, however it turned out to be far more comfortable to wrap your finger around the ring for better purchase.

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Nice idea!! Is the twist tempered? Don't know if you can temper railway spike steel. 

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20150502_100835_zpssrokwi4s.jpg

 

Forged from a railroad spike I had laying around. Initially I had intended a person's finger to go through the ring, however it turned out to be far more comfortable to wrap your finger around the ring for better purchase.

I like that. Would be interesting to have seen a regular bottle opener "tab" going into the ring so it's a true multipurpose bottle opener. 

 

Andy

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Hunterbow, did you leave a gap at the end of the ring? The picture looks like it but I can't say for sure. That might be an ok place to open a regular pop top bottle from.

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Hunterbow, did you leave a gap at the end of the ring? The picture looks like it but I can't say for sure. That might be an ok place to open a regular pop top bottle from.

Yes, I did leave a gap. Initially I intended for a person to place their index finger through the ring, but I did not draw the tine out long enough to allow an averaged sized finger to fit, so I introduced a gap to make up the difference. However, due to the geometry of the handle, it is very awkward to slip your finger into the ring anyway and much more comfortable to simply wrap your finger around the whole ring. It really does allow for a very secure grip. I really like your 2 in 1 opener suggestion and will give it a try on future pieces. 

Happy forging

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I wanted to post this in "Problem Solving" but got the dreaded Forbidden. Or it just wouldn't post for some other reason.

Anyway, it relates to bottle openers so I'll try here.

I make a lot of rail spike openers (a) because they're easy and good for demos and (b) because I have thousands of the things.

Those of you who do demos would know that you always get the people who want to buy the object you're making. Not a similar one off the shelf - they want "That one!" I guess they like to buy something they saw made.

Now therein lies a problem. The spike opener in the photo below is pretty much straight off the forge (after a bit of wire brushing) and I'm not keen to sell a raw piece like that to someone, only to have them find it's rusty in a few days time. Is there a quick and easy way of finishing an item like that so that it can be sold instantly? I've tried beeswax and it's gluggy. Oil doesn't do too well in the lady's handbag and spray finishes take time to dry.

Do you sell your bottle openers straight off the forge, and if so, what do you use as a finish??

DSC_4714.jpg

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a simple hot finish is to rub beeswax on to the metal while it is hot enough to make the wax smoke

its not perfect but gives a nice black color and seems to be a good rust preventive

butchers wax works ok but it has a far lower flash point that can be put on when the metal is warm

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OK, I'll give the beeswax another try. Maybe I don't have it hot enough.

 

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I use beeswax and kero mixed

What proportions? Applied hot? Warm? 

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Too hot just flares up, but got to be smoking when you put it on. Around 50/50. Tacky as cools but then it's good.

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Carnuba paste wax applied to hot coffee temp work fills all the nooks and crannies and hardens like resin when it cools a little bit. I apply it with the waxy rag I keep in the tin and wipe off the excess with the other one I keep in the tin. Trewax is the brand I've had for a long time, Bowling Ally Wax is another brand. I found just laying it on the anvil face for maybe 30 seconds sets it up hard. Dipping it in the slack tub once wiped off works fine and doesn't mess up the finish.

People want the piece they watched you make still warm from the forge and Trewaxed has never left a mark even laid on my card. I've never seen a recipe using bees wax that wasn't tacky at least for a while and the audience wants it right then, still warm.

You guys have probably gotten tired of me talking up Carnuba paste wax for an iron finish but it's the stuff they wax bowling alleys with and it requires a drum sanding to strip it to rewax. They rewax IIRC because it starts chipping, the stuff is really REALLY hard when cool. We have steel plant, etc. hangers outside that have been there since we built the place, about 17 years now and no rust, zero.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

Edited by Frosty

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You guys have probably gotten tired of me talking up Carnuba paste wax for an iron finish but it's the stuff they wax bowling alleys with and it requires a drum sanding to strip it to rewax. They rewax IIRC because it starts chipping, the stuff is really REALLY hard when cool. We have steel plant, etc. hangers outside that have been there since we built the place, about 17 years now and no rust, zero.

Yep, my father was a mech engineer and worked as a plant engineer running factories for various heavy industries, and he researched waxes because they wanted a food-safe wax to use on bone gelatine handling equipment. He told me that carnauba wax is the hardest, toughest wax known. I also use it, specifically Butcher's Bowling Alley Paste Wax. Works great.

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     I make a lot of rail spike openers (a) because they're easy and good for demos and (b) because I have thousands of the things.

Those of you who do demos would know that you always get the people who want to buy the object you're making. Not a similar one off the shelf - they want "That one!" I guess they like to buy something they saw made.

 

Ausfire, when you make those rail spike openers, if I'm seeing this right, you flatten the end 1st, then punch and drift correct?

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Frosty, I looked up carnauba wax and it seems popular as a car polish ingredient. I can get some in raw form here:

http://www.aussiesoapsupplies.com.au/carnauba-wax.html

Is that how you apply it? Melting those blobs. 

I have a can of commercial carnuba paste wax called "Trewax."

I have acquaintance who work jewelry who use carnuba beads but don't know how they'd use them as a finish on work. However, it's very brittle it's so hard and can be crushed so maybe a mortar and pestle then apply it to hot iron with a dry brush?

The can of Trewax has no other wax ingredient and I haven't read the label remains in a long LONG time so I don't know what they use to soften it other than it is volatile or it wouldn't evaporate letting the wax harden.

Frosty The Lucky.

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