j.w.s.

Bayonet

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I have in my collection a Haenel bayonet. It most likely dates from 1913. I took some pictures of it because I'd like to get some opinions on a good way to clean this blade and scabbard while still maintaining the integrity. I used oil and steel wool a few years ago on it however there is still some rather dark staining happening on the blade. I know that it wouldn't be wise to treat it like one of my own pieces and just go to town on it, so what kind of nifty tricks do the rest of you have up your sleeves? :) I was thinking of electrolytic removal however I'm unsure how the wood handle would react and judging by the way it's set on, I do not want to mess with the rivets.

-J

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4 ot steel wool and oil...that is what we used at the gun shop i worked at.. also a polished rounded piece of steel rubbed across the heavily pitted areas can help work down the pitting and make it look better.. also brownells sells a exstremely fine wire weel that is good for removeing rust without removeing blueing... its expencive but it works . good luck

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try puttng it blade down in electrolyte solution. but stopping it just before or in the guard. that may work if you don't cover teh handle. and ithink th ehandle looks like bakelite. very cool bayonet.

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The handle is definitely not bakelite. :) If this thing weren't 96 years old I'd definitely just tear it apart and clean it like any blade, but I know the blade has some history to it and I don't want to be the one to let it fall apart on my watch, especially as I've seen some of these sell for a very decent price, not that I'd ever consider parting with it. I even know the story of how it was retrieved, direct from the gentleman that gave it to me who did the dirty work retrieving it. I think this weekend I'll give the electrolytic process a test on another piece of steel in similar condition.

-J

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guess im wrong. but i remembered reading some where that the wooden handles on army knives were begining to be bakelite at that time. maybe it was later. oh well. i hop the restoration goes well. and how did th eman who did the dirty work for you get the knife?

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This gentleman gave me this piece when he was very late in years, right around 1990. He was about 17 when he went off to fight in the Great War (WWI). He was somewhere in France and I gathered the Germans were making a push for Paris at the time, sometime in the summer of 1918. A few of them got separated from the rest of their unit for a time. He and his group were pinned down by a few men for quite a while, once dusk approached they made a plan to circle and rush the position. Their plan had worked and once he got to the German's position, he knew beyond a shadow of a doubt that the soldier carrying it wouldn't be needing it anymore. I suppose this is just a teenagers first souvenir from a fight long forgotten during a war that perhaps only a few left on this planet have first handedly witnessed its horrors. He had no family left at the time. I guess since I enjoyed listening to the stories of an old man who's first defining actions were later over shadowed by another world war, he had decided that I should be its keeper. Over the years I guess you could say that restoring this is what actually got a small teenager inspired to go into blacksmithing. I'd just like to see it in it's best possible condition.

-J

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on the other hand, restoring can also ruin the value of an antique, if not careful, as most are worth the most in the original condition.

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good point MR. Sells. i remember somewhere an antiwue going for 1/2 of its real value after being restored. hope it turns out well Barcrawler.

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It is definitely German manufacture. They are sometimes referred to as a "butcher" bayonet because of the shape. Lots of Gewehr 98 Mauser rifles went off to WW1 with those on the end. I a just curious, at the place where the guard meets the blade on the back edge, there should be a tiny number and mark. That will tell you the year manufactured and where it was made.

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It is definitely German manufacture. They are sometimes referred to as a "butcher" bayonet because of the shape. Lots of Gewehr 98 Mauser rifles went off to WW1 with those on the end. I a just curious, at the place where the guard meets the blade on the back edge, there should be a tiny number and mark. That will tell you the year manufactured and where it was made.


not to be rude but Mauser and Gewher are two different arms manufacturers. i belive you may be refering to the Karibener 98 mauser. or perhaps i am wrong. just a thought and it still is a cool bayonet either way.

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The word Gewehr means "rifle" in German(perhaps there is a waffenfabrik/manufacturer called Gewehr in the present day? Not sure) - Here is some useless trivia though:D:

Mauser was the designer of the Gewehr 98(the rifle I believe this bayonet goes to, the "Model 1898"). The Karibininer is one model - it was the one used primarily by weapon crews, cavalry, Sto

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you may be refering to the karebiner kurz 98. i meant the b or postmans rifle. the ww1 version. this is such random trivia, looks as though you may be right.

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Oh, I saw "bayonet" and just had to look ;)
I have one just like that, but mine is from 1918 with "Alex Coppel, Solingen" on the side and the "W18" on the spine...I paid more for the bayonet than the rifle it sits on (K98) Though it is made for the G98(which I don't have) it fits on both.
I know some of them had saw-teeth in the spine, some being removed and some intact...
Personally, I would not re-finish it...just get rid of the rust and protect it as is.
Hang on to that thing, they are not real easy to find !!
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My .02$... Renaissance wax and that's it. I wouldn't "clean" it at all. That accumulation on there is part of the history of the piece. Maybe very light steel wool treatment to get the surface rust of. But the rest of the "patina" I'd leave personally.

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