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Found 7 results

  1. I just spent the last two weeks watching Clifton Ralph and Dave Manzer’s RIP DVD’s on power hammer tooling and techniques. Both these videos are well worth the money and time. The Clifton video is a low quality production and not professionally shot but the quality and quantity of information is so valuable you can forget about it not being pretty. I’m sure I could watch Mr. Ralphs work for the next couple years and still pick up information, besides he’s very entertaining and a kick to watch. Kind of like watching a grizzly peel the top off your car, to get at your fried chicken and give you that convertible you always wanted.
  2. I know I am preaching to the choir here since nearly all of you have known Clay Spencer longer than I have but, His current tooling class is an intensive program that has rewards in the instruction, hands-on smithing and the bevy of tools that the participants take home. The current cost is $300 and is sure to rise with the rising prices of steel. Clay furnishes everything but personal protection equipment and he will provide a list participants must supply. I took home 18 pieces of tooling, most of which sell at meets for $35-$45 each. Clay demonstrates the use of each and shows how the tools cut time and effort in many day to day challenges in blacksmithing. Clay is more than willing to share his vast knowledge and the chance to pick up and handle his hundreds of tools, dies and patterns will inspire one to stretch their limits in their own shop. He has a well equipped shop with Tire Hammers, Treadles, numerous Grinding and Drilling Stations. The class uses coal, gas and inductive forges in all phases. Not only does he show how, but why his techniques work and their uses. It's a weekend class that runs 9AM to 9PM on Saturday and 9 AM to 3 PM On Sunday. I prefer not to list his contact information on the web but if you will PM me I will share his e-mail. He is listed in The Bits magazine in the annual membership issue. Joe Gassen
  3. Hi, This is my first post to this site which looks like a great resource. Just stumbled upon hollow end chisels and was wondering what their purpose is for smithing?
  4. Being a newish smith I need tooling. Easiest to get it is buying it or making. With no budget I therefore make my own. I bought a great big cold chisel from princess auto (Canadian habour freight) (The chisel in question:<link removed>) , forged it, ground it, and attempted to harden it. First in a Synthetic machine oil, it being still soft I restarted from square one (Anneal, temperature cycle ect...) I then tried a room temperature water quench. It was slightly harder but still too soft to keep a chisel edge. According to this Bladesmithforum thread (<link removed>)(ps. Mods I don't know If I'm allowed to link to outside forums. please do let me know if I'm not allowed. <Mod note: Generally considered bad form>) most cold chisel steel is similar to 5160. I therefore attempted to start yet again this time following 5160 heat treating. Similar to what was described here (<link removed>)(By Doug Lester) in yet another bladesmith forum post. Despite this my chisel was still soft as butter. So I now turn to you folk. How would you recommend heat treating a hot cut chisel made from a cold chisel whose only markings are CR-V. TL:DR: No Idea how to heat treat a chisel made of mystery steel. Only clues are a marking on the stock of CR-V and that the original steel was a cold chisel. A few things I noticed: -The steel was soft under the hammer deforming easily. -It heated up quickly and lost heat quickly (At a rate I would have considered a bit quick for the size of piece I was working.) -The water quenched edge held for a few cuts before deforming to a useless rounded over smashed....... (Grumble grumble....) (Could have been caused by a novice smith hitting too hard on a chisel and not lifting his work piece off the chisel.) Let me know if you guys need or want any other information. If you read the heat treat pinned posts you would know how, it is all in there
  5. So i finally pulled the trigger on a # 5 flypree from OWA and while i am wating for it to arrive i have been reading up on tooling. I made it to ron reils page on flypress toolong through ABANA and saw his integral tool holder wich is just a extra tool holder clamped into the tool holder that is allready stock on the press ? Is there a good reason for this? It seemes to me if top tools are made correctley with a flange so the force is on the ram face not the end of the tool. Then this tool holder idea is just a silly way too waste 3" of working room. Or am i missing somthing?
  6. my good old stump finally outlived its usefulness as it was slightly too high and wobbeled so i decided to make a new stand out of 1/4 plate. I went with a european style sand filled box with a small modification ( i added a through hole in the base on 1 side just the right size to fit my floor jack so i can pick it up and move it when i need to. ). Ive only forged on it once so far but i seem to be getting more hit outa my peddinghaus than i used to and it dosent wiggle anymore. Enjoy
  7. Hey fellows! Here I am forging an edge tool together with Alec Steele while I was visiting him at his place in North Norfolk, England, United Kingdom. The tool was forged to finish from a piece of car axle. I directed while he struck for me; instructing how to make it at the same time: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yo6wTWRvbnM&feature=youtu.be Yours - Daniel