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Found 10 results

  1. Hey guys! New to forging and forge welding. Wondering if these are weld failures or is this the way the sides just look after welding. It was a 7 layer billet folded once of bandsaw blades and wood cutting skill saw blades. Thanks
  2. A while ago I tried to pattern weld with an old metal file. On my first welding heat it cracked and broke in half, does anyone know why?
  3. My first forge welding experiment: a small blade. Metal salvaged from discarded hank of ancient wire cable from the local lake. Spark tested well, and seems to hold a good edge!

    © Merrick_Hard 2016

  4. It has been a few (15) years since I've felt the need to do any forge welding. A couple of months ago, I turned an old porch post into a coat rack for my father in law. The nails I pulled were old iron cut nails. The post is 149 years old. Anyway, I stacked up the nails, twisted a wire around and went to the forge. A few cold shuts but I think it went OK. Now to decide what to do with it.
  5. Hello all! I'm Ryan, and this is my first post. This past year i've gotten into so many things, and one of them being forging. I've been able to get myself a nice forge, and nice tools, and "Ok" material. As in I live on a farm. so that's my steel supply! haha. SO my real point behind this post is i've been trying to forge weld, or fold steel, and i have not at all been able to get a handle on this. can someone give me a non-vague response and a detailed how to? i know i sound picky, but i've been poking around on the web for a week now, and everything posted so far reads like everyone has an abundant background on the subject, so "Flux" means many things to me. Solder flux? Rosin core? Acid flux? HALP This is my forge ~Part time wizard, Part time genius, Full time idiot.
  6. Dodge

    Yup, it welds

    I was going to amend another thread but I simply couldn't find it soooo I built this forge a couple years ago or 3 and I guessed then it would weld but never really tried til today. The pic shows the burner with a diferent T but I found I didn't need so much air so I went with a same-size T. Yeah I know 1" is overkill but I wanted to ensure it would weld. The billet started with 17 pieces of banding and 17 pieces of band saw. I still need to draw it out but ran out of time (and steam ;) ) did some other forging prior to the billet and first forging I've done for some time. My arm and related muscle groups are going to be sore tomorrow LOL Scott Edit: I rotated the last pic in my files every direction and it still won't post right. Mods; any help here?
  7. I am making my 33 ton log splitter double as a press for doing pattern welding only. Using the railroad rails shown below. I have them each cut into 6" pieces. My question for more experienced is should I alter the working surface of the dies or leave as they are....I will only use for making billets. I wasn't sure if I should grind them to be flatter or leave with the slight rounding on one side as can be seen.
  8. Here is a pendant that I made from a small piece of leftover billet - It is a 66 layer billet made from 1095, 1084 and 15n20.
  9. Recently, my passion for woodworking has been rekindled. I spent a few years building and installing high-end custom cabinetry and shutters several years back, before pursuing my current career as a paramedic. Paramedicine is typically characterized by long, loooooooooong hours (often more than 100 hours/week) and pitifully low wages (most of the "life-savers" who respond to your emergencies make a lower hourly wage less than that of a teenager working at In-n-Out Burger....hence the 100+ hours/week) and so after 8 years I have found myself in dire need of a hobby. While much of my previous experience was done using expensive power tools, I have found myself very interested in the idea of hand crafting wood and even the tools for woodworking. In my research and purchasing of tools, I began to entertain the notion of making my own chisels and plane irons. A premium 2 3/8" wide plane iron made of 3/32" O1 steel is roughly $40 from Hock Tools, whereas 18" of 2.5" wide O1 steel of the same thickness would cost me roughly $28+s/h. Likewise, with good O1 steel chisels running around $70/ea, I could theoretically make four or five for the price of one. Further reading and research led me to a number of ideas and techniques used to make premium hand tools, such as laminating a piece of high-carbon tool steel to mild steel or wrought iron to create a tool with that was able to take and keep a finely honed edge, while still retaining the shock absorbing and impact resistance properties of the milder steel (these were also much easier to sharpen as most of the bevel being hones was made up of the milder steel). I also read that tool steels typically contain 0.8%-1.2% carbon (with the higher quality steels having more carbon) and learned how the grain structure and molecular structures affect how finely and edge may be honed and how well it keeps that edge. I would also note that my father-in-law has been a professional ferrier for about 30 years, and has a small propane forge, anvil, various hammers and tongs, as well as a working understanding of blacksmithing (at least as it relates to shoeing horses). Thus, I have access to basic tools and enough knowledge to hopefully keep me from burning myself too badly-although, if I DO get burnt...well, there's something I HAVE been extensively trained to handle ;-) Now on to my harebrained schemes... 1) Use mild steel repurposed from old horseshoes, and forge weld a 0.03125" thick piece of O1 steel to the back of one side (using perhaps sand or borax as flux?), creating the laminated edge that is highly sought after in quality chisels and plane irons. The stock could then be rough shaped on the anvil, finished with files or grinders, and then heat treated and tempered before honing a final edge. 2) Simply anneal 0.25" thick O1 stock; then shape, heat treat, and temper accordingly. 3) Heat the O1 stock to critical temperature, then air-cool 2-3x before forge welding and/or shaping (I read in one thread that it is a common method of further reducing the grain size of the steel) 4) Use a case hardening method to increase the carbon content of the O1 stock from roughly 0.90% to (hopefully) something closer to 1.2% (I have a video tutorial/lesson by the American Gunsmithing Institute that explains and demonstrates case hardening small parts using a propane torch and carburizing liquid that is brushed onto the steel) Well, these are the ideas I am throwing around in my head. I would greatly appreciate any advise and/or caution from those with more knowledge on the subject. Thank you in advance!
  10. Recently I came across a little "portable gas forge" on Ebay for $200 and I may add that its the best working little forge. however I recently had a bit of an issue, I wasnt paying attention to my temperature and managed to melt through the ceramic blanket insulation, the firebrick shelf, and the bricks I put on the back of it, as well as several pieces I was attempting to work on. so my question is this, where is it possible to get insulation over 3000 degrees, why do people think its impossible to forge weld with gas, and how do people figure a gas forge will "Make the iron wither away instead of totally melt like a coal forge would do". It took no longer than 2 minutes to end up with a puddle of knife (keeping in mind I was using old lawn mower blades, forge welding them into solid billets and drawing them out) Can someone at least suggest how to better control the little monster? Its maximum PSI capacity is 30, I was operating under that and burnt the forge up (burner is still good!) I have a few pictures below to justify what I just said, the picture of the forge was AFTER I pulled the burnt insulation out just to show how little the thing is, the melted knife, and the insulation, brick, and shelf, as well as a picture of it lit that I took in bright light, with my cellphone