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Found 11 results

  1. I recently picked up an old rivet forge made by Canedy - Otto Mfg Co, usually known for their drill presses and larger blowers. I don't have a lot of info so I hope some of y'all might be able to help. Well I went to work restoring/refurbishing it as well as making upgrade like repairs in the prossess. Here are some pictures of the forge as I got it. The blower does turn but its not smooth and I worry that with every turn it could break a tooth. It's definitely not clean or lubed. Inside the forge is a brake rotor and tongs. The rotor will come into play later. As you can see, its been neglected for quite a while. We'll start with disassembly and wire brushing. It all started off easy, but then there was one stubborn bolt. I cleaned out and cut the slotted head, but it broke one of my flat head bits. So I cut into the back of the bolt, still to no avail. So finally I cut it off with the angle grinder. With a bit of gentle persuasion I got the extension off. As you can see its in pretty bad shape. I continue disassembly with the legs. The hardware was dirty and rusted. A little brush down with a wire brush and some WD-40 got the bolts out. The blower was attached with two bolts. Those came out without incident. Now I get to really clean it. I started brushing it down and found the gearbox had a separation where the lid goes on, so I opened or up. Here is a before and after showing how it is now compared to how gunked up it was. I cut a layer off the rotor so it'd sit more flush to the bottom if the pot. I also cut the pot to fit the rotor. It is so cracked and decayed that I don't feel bad about cutting it to make room. I prepared the metal for welding. As I welded in sections to stress the metal less I disassembled the legs further, wire brushed them, and painted them with rust converter. Put it all back together (plus some spacers under the pot and some new hardware where needed), grease the gears, and you're done! I'll make another post just for all the finished photos.
  2. This “bar light” was designed for a custom space and had a few key design elements that had to be achieved for the customer. 1) Had to light the bar, grill, counter,sink area well enough for a person to operate there safely. 2) No direct light can shine into the faces of people sitting around the near by fire pit. 3) Needed to be decorative but not block the view of the river that flows by the gazebo 4) Fit inside the log truss that forms the one of the 8 sides of this 40+ ft Gazebo 5) Have dragonfly’s. Original conceptual sketch. The light would actually be a piece of art that hid with in it a light. it is 14 ft across and 5.5 ft tall. Design was approved, not having a fabrication table large enough the concept is drawn out to scale on the shop floor. Next I cut the broad leaves, and Dragonfly's from 3/16" sheet metal and forge them in to shape. The 3/8 round rod that will make up the vines gets hammer textured to give it a more receptive look to the human eye. Using wire I am able to measure the length of the vines, cut and shape them to match the drawing. The pieces are then laid on the floor in their respective places. Once all of the pieces have been cut, textured, forged, and descaled I weld them all in place. I moved the piece on to a table at this point, this made it easier to finish cleaning and removing the discoloration, and scale from the forging and welding process. The piece gets a final prep, clear coated, and wired for lights. Here is the complete piece installed
  3. Ok...I'm a math flunky and I'm trying to build a new fire pot for my coal forge. What I can't figure out is at what angle do I cut the sides so that I have a square or rectangular pot that fits together?! There is probably an easy way to figure this, but is unbeknownst to me. Could someone give a pointer or two? Is there a calculator for geometry dummies out there or do I have to use online pyramid equation/calculators (which still keep me lost). I want to build a relatively standard firepot and I have 5'' by 1/4 plate. I thought 13 or 14'' sides would be good and about a 4''ish base for a 3'' pipe. Would love some help figuring this...Thanks!
  4. Here are a couple Bottle openers I made and some pictures of the process. 1) Cut a piece of your selected bar stock 7 ½” long 2) Upset on end until length is about 7 ¼” long let cool Mark piece ¾” and 1” from upset end and make 1/8” cuts with a hacksaw connecting around the four sides of the bar stock 3) Draw out 1 ¾” of the opposite end of your piece 4 sided taper but run the last 3/8” out very flat about 1/8” thick down to a point . it will be a short stocky looking draw out until total length is 8 ¾” 4)Start curling the last ½” back over the bar stock. You want a ¼” coming back over with a ¼” gap between the tip and the stock. 5)Next heat the upset end until white hot. Use a vice, sized open end wrench and adjustable wrench to twist the end. Twist the farthest cut from the upset end, go past 3/8 twist then come back to 1/4 turn. Use your open end wrench to hold the piece between your cuts, using an adjustable wrench return the upset butt end back to the orientation of the rest of your opener. 6)Now you add your design on the handle of you opener. Personally I like to hot stamp patterns, use a 1/2” bar, or spring fuller to make indentations on the corners every ¾” and then stamp on the flat side of the stock.*Note*You can make stamps the same way you make other tools high carbon steel heat up and air cool use files saws, dremal,,,,ect to make your design and then temper. In the picture a some of my stamps. 7)Next put some curve in your opener using a hardy bending tool so you don’t mess up your stamp work. *Note*If you curve it first it will straighten back out as you stamp 8)Remove from vice, brush of scale, and finish with antirust of your choice. Forge on my Friends!!!! David C.Kailey MorganJade Ironworks, Spokane, Wa
  5. Hey Fellows! Here you can watch the tutorial that I made on how to forge Brian´s pick up / hammer making tongs. The video is part of a series of videos Alec and I are going to make to support Brian´s "Tools to make Tools" curriculum the International YoungSmiths team will be going through during the event at Tannehill Forge School of Blacksmithing Summer 2013.
  6. Hi guys, here is a little guide on how to forge a rams head wall hook. I am not a professional instructor and this is just the way I do it currently. I made a video and extracted the most important frames (full video on the bottom of the page): 1. Take a sqare bar (here 12mm) mild steel and draw down about 2 1/2 inches to half parent bar thickness 2. Split the set off section with a hot chissel along the middle 3. Fuller inbetween the horns and clean up with a file 4. Taper both horns (fold one horn back so you can work on the other)
  7. Hey Guys, just me showing one possibility to make a hammer eye punch. I used C60 tool steel in 20mm round stock: Here are the different steps: 1. forge the round bar to an octagonal shape 2. create a teardrop shape about 1 inch below the top 3. create a light taper that starts of at the end of the teardrop and gets thicker for about 2 - 3 inches 4. then cut off additional 4 inches and create a light taper that gets thinner to the tip 5. taper about 1 - 2 inches at the tip thinner than the rest 6. planish and make everything nice and straight 7. dress the striking face 8. dress the surface of the rest of the tool and remove remaining sharp corners (optional) 9. heat up the whole tool above the transition point and let cool down slow (eg. in sand or on coals) to anneal it 10. grind the tip 11. heat up about 1 inch of the tip to cherry red colour and quench it in water or in oil to harden it (optional) ATTENTION: NEVER harden the striking face!!! 12. temper the hardened portion and a bit above to sky blue colour 13. clean it and touch up the edge 14. look out for cracks, test whether it is shatter proof 15. have fun with it :). Here is the one I made in the video: Well I hope this was helpfull. Yours - Daniel
  8. 2 months ago I found one of the first pieces I ever forged, and remembered how hard it was for me to find info on proper forging techniques, and it was then that I decided to make a series of video's that I hope will give newbie's the info needed to start forging. So here are the links. This video is about building your own coal forge and firepot In this video I show how to light a coal forge by just using 3 sheets of news paper I hope these video's are helpful and happy forging. Trip
  9. Hey Guys, in this very video I explain the procedure to make box jaw tongs that fit for 25x10mm flat bar. Due to the fact that a lot of people saw TechnicusJoe´s tongs videos to be mirrored in my video I watched his and yes, I can also see the similarities. But this must have happened unconsciously and I, although I sure have been influenced by his work, did not try to copy him on purpose. My main source for the box jaw tongs and the welded on rains was Mark Aspery´s video, for the flat jaw tong what I was taught in France and for the drawing out Brian Brazeal´s video. The purpose of this video is to show people that are keen to learn the technique to make a pair of box jaw tongs and I think it - as well as Joe´s videos do - suits that purpose very well. I took to note that this problem is in place and I will watch out for it in future videos. But I don´t need ten or more additional people tell me this over and over again ;). That being said I hope you will have fun and benefit from watching it ^_^. Yours - Daniel
  10. hey guys, i need some advice. i am wanting to build a brick forge and have a few ideas as to the construction but i was wondering if any of you could lend me some ideas too. me and my buisness partners are merging our blacksmithing company's into one big one and we do anything from blades to home decor we have a coal portable forge and a propane portable and now we are wanting a permanent brick one to work out of. we will be using coal. and will be hooking up a electric blower to it that will provide air probably from underneath. if any of you have any blueprints i would love to look them over. i am getting ready to pour a concrete pad to build it on. hope you all can help.