Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Coal'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • I Forge Iron Forum
    • Keeping You Informed
    • Feedback and Support
  • Blacksmithing
    • Blacksmithing, General Discussion
    • Anvils, Swage Blocks, and Mandrels
    • Stands for Anvils, Swage Blocks, etc
    • Forges
    • Blacksmith Tooling
    • Vises
    • Heat Treating, general discussion
    • Building, Designing a Shop
    • Problem Solving
    • Alchemy and Formulas
    • Fluxes used in blacksmithing
    • Finishes for Metal
    • Metallurgy
    • Metal Sculpture & Carvings
    • Cold Worked Iron and Steel
    • The Business Side of Blacksmithing
    • Smelting, Melting, Foundry, and Casting
    • Member Projects
  • Machinery and power tools
    • Machinery General Discussions
    • Power Hammers, Treadle Hammers, Olivers
    • Presses
    • Grinders, Sanders, etc
    • Drills, Post drills, Mag drills, etc
    • Lathes
    • MIlls, Milling machines, etc
    • Saws, bandsaws, hack saws, etc
    • Shears
  • Bladesmithing
    • Knife Making
    • Knife making Class General Class Discussion
    • Knife Making Classes
    • Axes, Hatchets, Hawks, Choppers, etc
    • Chisels, Gouges, Scissors, etc
    • Finish and Polish for Knives
    • Folding Knives
    • Heat Treating Knives, Blades etc
    • Historical Blades
    • Spears, Arrows, Pole arms, Mace/hammer etc.
    • Swordsmithing
  • Non-ferrous metal working
    • General Metal Specific Discussion
    • Aluminum Alloys
    • Copper Alloys
    • Mokume Gane
    • Non-ferrous metal - heat treating
    • Repousse
    • Titanium Alloys
  • Welding / Fabrication
    • Welding/Fab General Discussion
    • Welder's beginers course
    • Welding Equipment
  • Misc Discussions
    • Introduce Yourself
    • Everything Else
    • Events, Hammer ins, Where to meet
    • Book Reviews
    • Tuesday night blueprints
    • Vulcan's Grill, food recipes
    • Farriers and Horse stuff
    • Shop Tips n' Tricks
    • Gunsmithing, Muskets, Flintlocks etc
  • Store
    • Shirts, Apparel, Wearable goods
    • Gas Forge Refractories and Supplies
    • Hand Hammers
    • Books, Printed Material
  • Safety
    • Safety discussions
    • Personal Protection Equipment
    • Zinc, galvanized, and coatings
  • Sections
    • In Case of Emergency
    • Prayer List
  • Blacksmith Groups Forum
    • Australia
    • Canada
    • South Africa
    • United Kingdom
    • Ukraine
    • United States
    • Inactive

Categories

  • Pages
  • Articles
  • Blueprints
    • 00 series
    • Original Series
    • 100 Series
    • Uri Hofi Series
  • Lessons in Blacksmithing
  • Miscellaneous
  • Stories
  • The Smithy
  • You Might Be A
    • You might be a Coppersmith if
    • You might be a Tinsmith if
    • You might be a Machinist if
    • You might be a Knifemaker if
    • You might be a farrier if
  • Vulcan's Grill

Categories

  • Books
    • Introductory
  • Newsletters
    • AABA Anvil's Horn
    • New England Blacksmiths Newsletter
  • Trade Journals
    • American Blacksmith and Motor Shop

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Location


Biography


Interests


Occupation

  1. Hello! So I am currently talking to some people about this in my other topic, but I figured it might be nice to just have a subject about it for beginners like me. I am curious about how much air certain fuels need. I am using coal, but answers for coke and charcoal would be great to for others. For me, I don't believe I am getting enough air to my fire. I don't have any obstructions, maybe some clinker, but not enough to stop my fire from getting hot enough. I am using either a small Chinese hand crank blower or a small squirrel cage blower. The fire would get hot, but it was small and it seemed like a lot of work to get it to get the whole fire hot. I had trouble heating up a 3/8" bar. I tired using a shop vac on the blow side, and it lit it up easily, though I had to restrict air flow a lot, and even when I was blowing as little air as possible, I think I was just burning through fuel. So I think, I don't know, but I think I need a bigger blower then the small ones, and a smaller blower then the vaccum. Also, my coal has been sitting outside for years, so it is quite crumbly which I am sure means something, I just don't know what. And... I believe that's all my questions! Thanks for any help you give!
  2. Hey again! It's been a long time since I've been on here. I posted a while ago asking for help with a brake drum forge that wasn't getting hot enough. Or I wasn't using right. I got a lot of good help and advice, but I quickly learned it wasn't quite built right, so of course I go on a hiatus. Now with all this time on my hands due to Covid-19, I went out and started building a shop with a chimney so I could stop adding smoke damage to the porch roof. I disassembled the old forge and grabbed a 55 gallon barrel. I cut a door out of it, a chimney hole in the top and a big hole in the bottom. I set the brake drum into the hole on the inside. One of the things I learned is that I needed a grate in my tuyere pipe to help keep it clear (Who woulda thunk?) So I made one out of two 1 1/2" x 2" strips of steel "slotted" together to make a tall "X" that I just slid into the pipe. So, I went out today and lit it up, and started working on a simple J-hook. Not long into it though, I needed to completely reset the fire to get it hot again. I had to do this many times. It took me 2 1/2 hours to make half of a J-hook out of 3/8" x 3/8" stock. I might not be doing it right, I might need to adjust it, but I'm done messing with the bottom blast design. So I am thinking about drilling a hole in the side of the barrel and just shoving a pipe in to make a side blast forge. Would that work better? The way I see it is then the pipe isn't really getting clogged, because it isn't moving down into the airflow. So with this, is it better to have the pipe blowing directly into the fire, or is it better to off-set it to circle the air around the fire? Also, here are pictures of it. I need to make a proper bracket for the blower still. Also, the bottom wall of the barrel is 6" tall. Is that perhaps too tall? I can get more pictures if it would help. Thank you guys so much for your help! Em... Apparently it's not uploading the photos on the phone, I'll have to get on the computer.
  3. Hey guys! I've posted and talk about a propane tank enclosed forge me and my dad are building, but now I have some questions about our old brake drum forge we built maybe 4 years ago. It's pretty open, (Check pics) though it holds a decent enough amount of coal. But the problem is that I'm not getting enough heat. It take a long time to heat up the steel, and it's hard to heat up even just a rail road spike to bright orange. So... What can I improve on this forge to fix this? We only have the one pipe at the bottom of the forge for airflow with a little door at the bottom to let out xxxx, and I am using a little electric squirrel cage blower as a bellows. I think it might be possible that the air is hitting the metal, so it cools it off rather then just blowing the fire. I also am getting a lot of small coke and small clinkers down the pipe, but I think just welding a grate over it would fix it. What do you think? What would help? Do I need more airflow, and the airflow spread out more rather then just the one spot? Also, we don't have an anvil but we do have this big 150-200 lb. steel block that's perfect, it just doesn't have a horn. Though, I'm thinking I can just turn a cone on the lathe out of 3"-4" steel bar and weld it on. Would that work do you think?
  4. Hello everyone out there. I am from Indian River Michigan. I have been reading a bunch of the post, and trying to figure everything out. Maybe I just have not found the right post yet to answer my question. Or I am just so new idk what I am talking about yet. I am trying to figure out the difference between the hard fuels used in a forge. I am looking at building a variation of a JABOD forge and trying to go cheap as possible, but trying to figure out fuel now. I think I know two of them. Charcoal: made from burning/drying out wood? Coal: is dug up from the earth Coke: I have no idea. Is this something you can make? BBQ coal: something you don’t want to use for forging. Why is that? if there is a post out there that explains all this all ready I have not found it and I will be more than happy to go there and read it all just need to know we’re it is at.
  5. Hello everyone out there. I have been looking around this site on and off for a while now. I am relatively new to forging and trying to get a forge up and going. I tried a coffee can forge with a Walmart special propane torch. It does not get hot enough to even get the metal workable. So I have decided to make a coal forge out of a old propane grill. I have been seeing a lot about JABOD forges and I am thinking that is the way I wan to go. What should I know about making one. And any other suggestions or tips I should know. Any help is greatly appreciative. I am mainly looking to make knives. May move up to bigger stuff later.
  6. Hello IFI, I've been passing through this forum for quite some time and as I just fired my first home built forge I though it time to join. Here's the build out list: Brake Disc, 16x30 metal cart, Buffalo blower, 2 inch piping for tuyere, clay, fire brick, and regular brick. sheet metal. I clayed the entire cart around the disc under the bricks, this leveled things out for the brick mostly, but also added a nice added layer of thermal protection to the cheap cart metal. Fire brick is cut around the disc face, giving me a pot 3.5 inches deep and 7 inches wide. Picked up the blower for a steal on auction, ugly on the outside but beautiful on the inside, once I cleaned it out and re-lubed it turns like brand new. Currently I've got a 2x4 and metal straps holding it rigid with the piping but plan to swap that for some metal brackets in the future, it was just all I had laying around at the time. Lastly I added the simple metal surround for wind protection plus the added benefit of being able to pile extra fuel up that back wall in the corners. Fired for the first time Sunday with some nice lump charcoal, wally world was having a sale so why not... As it was over 100 degrees out I mostly just beat up some rebar I had laying around before shutting things down, test firing was a huge success. I noticed a few odd hot spots underneath the cart and decided to clay in the interior of the pot as well which I should have done it to begin with anyways, but that should take care of my errant heat. We'll see in a few days when I have time to light it up again. Outside of heating things up with a torch and beating them until they submit to my will around the homestead I've only ever worked steel on a lathe and that was a few (read 20) years ago. I've done some forging of specialty tools made out of soft metals like copper and bronze in the distant past as well but never what I would call blacksmithing of anything. I've been wanting to get into this side of things for quite awhile so I'm excited about this forge build and can't wait to see how ugly my first projects turn out. Ha ha. Attaching some pics for your pleasure or verbal destruction, whichever your bent.
  7. Hello there! New member here, me and my dad are in the middle of building a propane tank forge. So far it is all put together, cut open and ready for refractories. Here's our issue: He have some ceramic wool to line the inside, 1" thick. We know that it is better to do 2", and I think we have enough for 2". We Also have 2 5-gallon buckets of unknown refractory cement (We don't know what kind/brand it is, we just know that it is refractory cement). Our original plan was to line the forge with the wool, and then coat it with the refractory. But as I've been reading and looking around, I've heard about rigidizer and that wool insulates better, etc. So we are wondering what we should do. I think we are going to line it and try a thin layer of the cement on the bottom to test the cement and to see how well it adheres and such to the wool. We just need advice and tips, what we should do, etc... We haven't built one of theses before (Obviously) but we have built a brake drum open forge. The other thing we want to do is to use a blower and coal rather then propane because we have a TON of coal. We are making it so we can use coal or we will be able to switch out the fan for a propane burner. We are going to have a rounded bottom in the forge, rather then flat so that when we put coal in it the coal will make a flat bed to put the steel/knives/etc. on top of it. We have put the face of the forge on a hinge so we can open it and clean it out, shovel the coal out, etc. Thoughts on this? The last thing for right now is that we have seen people put a hole in the back of the forge, and we aren't sure if it is for anything other then just long pieces of bar stock, so insight on this would be great. And, literally anything you could tell me about blacksmithing! Any tips, tricks, advice, literally anything would be helpful. We have a shop with lots of tools and machines, and we have both done a bit of blacksmithing, but I want to really expand my blacksmithing knowledge and skill this year, Thanks!
  8. Does anyone have any information about this item or it’s value. I’m sorry for the horrible picture & the tiller the way. It was my grandpa’s. Located in Des Moines, Iowa. I appreciate your help-tyi!
  9. What's the best coal to use. I am in Australia and heard that Jarrah was great and left nothing behind ?
  10. I've been thinking quite a bit about ways to minimize exposure to coal smoke. Even when my chimney is working well, the smoke sometimes will still linger around in a cloud (the forge is outdoors), resulting in me breathing some in. I'd also rather NOT have a nasty cloud in the backyard, given the choice. Here's my idea, as I imagine it working in a perfect world: Since my chimney is just a side draft from a tall piece of stovepipe, I could cut out a section and make a small hinged door somewhere in the middle of the chimney, and place a grate inside the pipe. Then, before lighting the coal in the forge, I could start a small wood fire on the grate in the middle of the chimney, and maintain it for the duration that I use the forge. Not only would this help with maintaining a strong draft, it would also burn off all the coal smoke that went up the chimney. Hopefully I explained that well enough to get the main points across. Now the questions: Has anyone tried anything similar to this? Would the draft of the chimney make it difficult to keep the small wood fire going? How "much" heat does it take to ignite coal smoke? Would just a small electric arc be sufficient? What about a candle? Perhaps some testing is in order. Would this be dangerous to try? I'm really interested to hear peoples thoughts about this. Thanks!
  11. So I have a question as to the cost of coal. Like many I bought anthracite from TSC. During my quest for a solid fuel, my son found a place in Western Missouri called Continental coal company. He said he called them and it was $65 a ton. Then he couldn't find their number. My local TSC doesn't stock either. No anthracite, or coal of any kind. The stuff I got, I got while out of town visiting family. Finally I located the phone number (according to Google) for them and called. The number listed was their fax machine. After a bit of searching I located another phone number and called it. (I suggested an edit with Google that's in review) The lady answered by saying "Continental". Knowing I finally got the right number I asked if they sell to the public and she said I needed to talk to a gentleman named Chris and gave me his number. I called Chris and asked the same question. Yes they sell to the public at $65 a ton. No minimum. He said he has people come in and buy a tote full for forging with and some that being in trailers. He said it is bituminous, about 11k btu and I think he said size "0"...? Still not sure if I heard the size correct. So here's my question, go or no go? Btw, I have the phone number. IF I'M ALLOWED to post it, I will. I'll wait on admin or Glenn to give me the ok for that.
  12. I managed to get a 55 gallon drum this week that used to have hydraulic fluid in it. I was also able to get 2 different size brake rotors. I started by overflowing it with a garden hose since I could tell there was some fluid left in there. I would rather have water on the shop floor than hydro fluid. Less chance of busting my rear from sliding around. I then cut the front open. Used my plasma cutter to Cut the bottom using a smaller brake rotor as a template. Flipped it over cut a slightly larger hole in the top using a larger rotor as the template Put the large rotor in the bottom hole. It sets perfect in the smaller hole with the flange sitting on the drum floor. Next I built a fire the boy scouts would be proud of. looks worse than what it was. That's just the hydraulic fluid and paint burning of the outside of the drum. After it settled down, I cut a V in the front so I could rest my work piece on and opened it up a bit along the top of the front opening. Since it was all cardboard and paper in there burning and dinner was ready I let it burn out and called it a night.
  13. Anyone know how I could make a Cinder-block coal forge?
  14. Hi, I'm fairly new to blacksmithing and I don't know where I went wrong, but today I broke my blade. I was flattening the handle of a drop forged wrench, and I put it in the forge. It's bituminous coal and I use a hair dryer attached to a pipe as an air source. It gets the metal orange-white hot. I took it out after 5-6 minutes and I noticed a chip out of the blade, it was the spine so I dismissed it. But as I started pounding, a crack appeared that ran next to the chip from the spine to the side that the edge was going to be on. I don't know where I went wrong, but I have a few therioes. The first is that, since I didn't brush the blade each time before I pounded, that I pushed some of those chips that fly off into the blade. Another theory is that I left it in the forge for too long and it got too soft. A third is that, instead of just pounding it into a blade shape and then trying to get it longer, I should've pounded it into a long, rectangular shape, like a piece of barstock looks, then formed the blade shape. Sorry for such a long post, I am just angry that I broke my blade and I dont know why it happened, and I don't want to do it again. Any help would be appreciated, Thanks!
  15. So basically, I built this forge out of an old aluminum grill top. My hopes were to use this as a small coal forge for bladesmithing. My question is, will the aluminum shell be able to withstand these temperatures with proper insulation? The shell is approximately 28" wide, 20" long and 8" deep. Essentially, I did a 3 inch layer of pea gravel on the bottom, around a black steel air intake. I used a mound of foundation sand for the pit, and filled in the empty space with a clay top soil. I'm pretty confident that this will be sufficient insulation on the sides/bottom, however I am concerned about the lip of the shell conducting heat. It is slightly raised above the pit and is as close as 8" in parts. I have included a picture of the set up. This is my first forge and I would love some experienced advice. Thanks in advance.
  16. This is my first post and I just started learning but found a good place to get coal if you don't mind a drive depending where you live. It's in xxxx, colorado. Probably a bit of a drive but their coal is $100 per ton, just call xxxxxxxxxxxx at xxx xxx xxxx. Follow their menu to purchasing and they will direct you to the person to buy through. I'm not sure what kind of coal they have as I haven't managed to pick any up yet. Once I do I will update everyone with more detail.
  17. Looking for somewhere I can get coal without the hassle of buying bags or shipping. Anyone have any leads? Thanks!
  18. Good morning all! I am new to smithing and new to this site. I am attempting to build a coal forge from some parts I have and want to get some feedback before I finish it. I had a metal cart and put in a truck hub into it. I notched out the sides to be able to put a longer piece in it in the future. At the Bottom, I plan to put a pipe feeding air with a tee in it and attach a blower to the end. The blower I want to put on a dimmer (not sure if this will work yet) so I can control the air flow. I already have the blower, just needing to buy the piping. Does this look like a good approach so far? What would you have done different? I left some room on the side of the pot to be able to put up some fire bricks to build a side/top if needed. Do I need to line the pot with anything? Thanks for the advice. Dave
  19. Hi All, I've just started out, and the supply of fuel that came with my forge is very close to running out.... Any Smiths in South Central/South East England that have a good supplier?? I can't seem to find anything!!! Sorry if this has been asked before!! James.
  20. Well I recently finished up my third forge and thought I'd share the build with you all as I think it turned out pretty well. Sorry about all the pics, but everybody like pics right!?!? Back in about 2007, I built a real nice propane gas forge for my very first forge, and while it worked well, I quickly realized that I needed something that could handle a wider piece. So about a year later, I ended up making a simple coal forge from a wheelbarrow tub and a clothes dryer blower. I figured I'd make something simple, quick and cheap... then when I get more experience and could figure out exactly what I wanted in a forge, I could build one specifically to suit my needs. Well I finally went and did it, and I took pictures too! ... Lots and lots of pictures... To reminisce... here is a picture of my first gas forge, and also my simple wheelbarrow forge. Now, let's get on with the build! I've always considered the the firepot to be the heart of the forge, so that's what I started with. I have a CNC plasma cutting table so I drew up the firepot in Corel Draw, then cut out the pieces from 1/4" A36 HR steel and welded it up. Then I drew up an easy to replace "grate plate" for the bottom of the firpot. I was going to just weld in some bars for the grate, but thought I could easily cut a new one when it gets burnt out, and just drop it in place like this. The extra thickness will help the firpot last longer as well. Next I drew up the floor pan and cut it out from 3/16" steel, then drew up the four sides, cut them out, and welded them to the floor pan. Then I welded on some legs from 2X2 square tubing, welded some feet on them, and added some wheels on the back legs. The finished floor pan height is 32". I tore apart my wheelbarrow forge and used the blower, tuyere, and ash dump from it since it would save time, and it already worked great. I do wish the ash dump was deeper, but I can live with emptying it more often. I also welded on some bracing straps to mount the blower directly to the tuyere. I was going to drill and tap some holes in the bottom of the firepot, but I couldn't find my tap and die set, so I figured out which position I wanted the tuyere, drilled some matching holes in the firepot and the flange, then cut the heads off some 3/8" bolts and welded them in place to use as studs instead. I used blue tape to hold the studs upward in place while I plug welded them from the bottom inside of the firepot. Worked great! Here you can see a close up of them bolted together, a complete shot of my firepot/tuyere/blower/ash dump assembly, and finally with it installed under the forge body. I drew and cut out a piece of 14 guage steel for an air gate, then welded a handle and a stop to it. CNC plasma tables sure are handy! I decided to weld on some bars to hold my tongs, shovel, rake, etc... from 3/8" X 1" bar stock. I put them on three sides since I wanted the versability to be able to use it in lots of orientations. I have these openings on all four sides so I can get longer stock, low into the sweet spot if I need to, but I still wanted to be able to close the openings if I'm not using them so coal won't spill out. (also... the opening on the one end farthest from the firepot is deeper and flush with the floor pan in case I ever want to clean out the forge by sweeping rather than tipping it over) So to close them, I made some sliding "coal gates" that can be partially or fully slid out of the way, or even flipped to the outside when I want to open them. All four of the coal gates are identical for ease of replacement. Then I welded in some cord hangers to hold the 20' power cable. I couldn't decide on where to mount the power switch since I wasn't sure which of the 3 sides I would be using as the front, so I decided to attach the switch to a movable mount that can attach to anywhere on the forge body. I also used flexible steel conduit to help protect the wires from heat. And here it is all finished up! I painted the firepot and floor pan hi temp black, but painted everything else industrial grey since that's what I paint all my home built tools in. I also made a removable support extension for long stock that can mount anywhere on the forge body, and also stores conveniently on any side when I'm not using it. It's exactly 24" long and 12" wide to double as a measuring tool if needed, plus I bolted on a piece of broken measuring tape to it, for smaller measurements. Can't wait to fire it up!
  21. Ok so I built a shop recently for blacksmithing. I needed to make a chimney set up so I took an old water pressure tank and used it as the hood. I have 6" chimney single wall going above the roof. The hood opening is 13" tall and about 14" wide. The hood is also resting on the forge. Anyway when I tried using it smoke did go up the chimney but some would puff out towards the top of the hood. The smoke buildup is not good and hard on my lungs. So my question is what am I doing wrong here? I did a little reading on threads and other websites about the chimney needing to be at least 10" or the hood needs to be lower. I can't make the hood lower without cutting more of the tank off because it is resting on the forge. Or should I scrap the hood and buy a professionally made one with 10" chimney?
  22. Hey all, So I know this has been asked before, but I am new to the world of forging and am on a limited budget so I built a brake drum forge, with a 1.5 inch flange and pipe welded onto the bottom, with the tee fitting to allow for an ash dump and an air supply (two speed hair dryer). I initially made the mistake of using anthracite coal, so I switched to lump charcoal, because I cant find bituminous. I am able to get the forge hot enough to bring my rail road spike up to a nice glowing red, but after the first heat it's a constant battle to get the spike back up to a good temp as well as getting a uniform even temp on the spike. Not sure what I am doing wrong, because I know it gets hot enough, I melted one of my spikes in half. I have spent almost 50 hrs trying to make a single knife, so I am getting discouraged. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
  23. I decided to try designing a fire pot for my eventual coal/coke forge and I'm not sure if my clinker breaker design will cut the mustard. Does anyone have any input on if this design will work or experiences with a similar design? Any feedback is greatly appreciated. Best Regards, Jason
  24. So I recently picked up a 'new' 2nd hand forge. From what I could see on first hand is that is is quite a good shape, the last owner said that his dad gave it to him brand new a couple of years ago and that he'd wanted to get in to blacksmithing, tried it out and found out it wasn't for him, and he had it sitting in his workshop for a few years and decided to sell it. I paid 165 euros for it and it works like a dream. I am extremely happy with my purchase, I practically stole it from him
  25. For those that haven't seen my post about me acquiring an antique forge recently, the picture of it is below. I wanted your advice on how I could make a firepot about softball sized with extra flat space (I don't know the specific name of it, like a table) around it for holding coal. Since my forge is a rivet forge it did not come with a firepot and with the tuyere about half an inch above the bottom of the pan. My idea was putting dirt into the bottom of the pan so it would fill in that half an inch under the tuyere. Then I'd make the firepot out of sheet metal. The pan is 18" diameter. Thoughts on this idea or if you have another idea?
×
×
  • Create New...