Doglegged

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About Doglegged

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    Bowling Green, KY.
  1. Not sure who this leg vice is made by, the first 2 letters seem to be WF and the last ER and below that seems to be an A•11 any info on this will be greatly appreciated. Also that's the only markers I could find on the vice.
  2. Well I really only have one of those sorry I didn't mention that before I just noticed the picture included the 2nd one, the other he sold to someone else. I'm thinking about cutting about 12in. Off of it and having a post anvil and then using the remaining 3ft. As an horizontal anvil. We didn't have a way to weight them but it took 2 burly men to pick it up.
  3. That's the thing I'm not exactly sure what I want to make right now. So far ive made some J hook type stuff, I've made 2 pairs of tongs. I'm not real big into knife making but making a knife will be something I do just not a lot of and if I was to make something with a sharp edge I would want to make a straight razor blade.
  4. I was thinking the same I've always been told "The amount space you work on is how big your hammer face is" or something like that lol. But yea I hope it makes a great anvil for now till I at least get a real anvil
  5. Friend of mine who is a local blacksmith found this 5x5 square stock for me at a junkyard and it's about 4ft. Long. I bought it off him for 10 bucks and has alot more rebound than my railroad track and I was wondering what would be the best way to mount this? Upright like a post anvil?or horizontal? and weld some legs to it? I asked him and he said it's really personal preference but he is not sure. He has never used a post anvil or anything like what is pictured as an anvil and he didn't want to really tell me anything wrong. So I'm asking
  6. Thanks for all the info guys I really appreciate it. Thomas powers, yea we do have clay I was just asking about the lime because its in a big pile right outside my door and its readily available to me all the time. Smoggy, the limestone yes is used for the farmland here in Kentucky. My father-in law owns a trucking and lime spreading business and our property lines meet and he just uses my field to pile up the lime because he has easier access to it from my property when loading into the lime truck. I'm liking the idea of using it on the floor Thomaspowers that stuff packs down like concrete.
  7. I done some research on that and found out what your talking about can happen, correct me if I'm wrong though the only way that it will turn to Quicklime though is if it gets water on it.
  8. Thanks for the info, not a lot of on the internet that pertains to my question and I figured the next best thing is here and hopefully I can learn a lot from the community here.
  9. My question for you all is, will crushed limestone work in a forge much like people using sand in some charcoal forges? the limestone I have is crushed almost to the point were it is dust, kinda like baby powder just not as powdery. I know that with a little research crushed limestone was used as a cement way back in the day. My reason for asking is because I have about 4 tons of it sitting in a pile out in my field and when it gets wet its very hard and stays cool on very hot days. Any info will be greatly appreciated.