Bob JS

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About Bob JS

  • Rank
    Senior Member

Converted

  • Location
    West London
  • Interests
    Traditional crafts, engineering, steam and stationary engines, canals and boating Blacksmithing
  • Occupation
    Looking for an apprenticeship with a smith.

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  1. very nice, What is the finish? looks browned but it could just be the photo
  2. Absolute first? or first presentation quality piece? Either way, even I can see that is exceptional work. How long did it take?
  3. Thanks for the info and advice. Dodge, It can be caused by electrolysis - which produces hydrogen gas. Apparently this can be absorbed into the lattice of the steel, and prevents the molecules being able to move/slide around if impacted or bent - embrittlement. I wont go into too much detail, because I only 'know' what I have spent the last few days reading - but there is usually a very vauge cautionary note at the bottom of the sets of instructions for electroysis found on the net. Apparently it is common for parts to be baked in ovens after electroplating in industry. Thanks again. Bob
  4. I was hoping that I could use the electrolysis method to clean the hammers that follwed me home last week, but I have questions about Hyrogen embrittlement: Is it a concern with hammers? - or just small items like springs etc I understand the hydrogen will be released from the steel over time - but I cant find any info on time scale - how long does it take? day months, years?? I also understand that baking the piece in an oven bellow tempering temperature will drive out the hydrogen - is there any safety issues here? I imagine the volume of hydrogen relased is small, but I like to be sure when dealing with hot explosive gasses in the house! Thanks for your help, advice and opinions. Bob
  5. True. Was looking for metal boxes the previous week, but people were wanting
  6. A few hammers... There are at least 100 there. I know I already have far too many hammers for a beginner - but could you turn down this many for
  7. Seeing those curled back claws makes me wonder if you could forge an animal head from one to make a nice top for a walking stick??
  8. Bob JS

    Hammer Axe

    A small nackered ball pein hammer reworked into a little axe/hatchet that I use to split kindling to start my forge fire. Quenched in hot water.
  9. Bob JS

    leaves.

    Leaved no. 3&4 with a forge welded stem. The plan is to keep practicing leaves and forgewelding by slowing atting to and making a branch of a tree.
  10. Bob JS

    100_4437

    A windlass. Used to operate the locks on UK waterways. I think originally the eye would have been formed by folding over and forge welding wrought iron. I thought it would be safer to split and drift at my skill level.
  11. Bob JS

    Windlass

    A windlass. Used to operate the locks on UK waterways. I think originally the eye would have been formed by folding over and forge welding wrought iron. I thought it would be safer to split and drift at my skill level.
  12. Bob JS

    Pen holder

    My unexpected last miniyte entry to the Blacksmiths Guild forging competition at a local show.
  13. Bob JS

    Split eye.

    The split eye for a lock windlass ready to start drifting.
  14. Bob JS

    Spliting the eye.

    Spliting the eye of a lock windlass.