CoyoteGear

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About CoyoteGear

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    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 10/25/1984

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    Male
  • Location
    : Bremerton, WA

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  1. @bigb, the doors are still doing good, make sure to add a top bracket, I've knocked the doors over with just a bottom bracket. Luckily they only have about 2" to fall, but if they were to fall to the ground it would be game over. @ThomasPowers, I agree with the plaster being a POS liner. Which is why I didn't waste ITC on it. As for the sharp angles, it's a cylinder so I'm not sure how to get less of an angle... Anyway once it's redone in kastolite I'll be re sealing with the ITC and continue forging on.
  2. I replaced my floor about a month ago, I'd say it held up rather well. Forging with it about once a week (avg) I had some flux drip onto it and finally killed it, that stuff is like acid on the brick. I also have had to repair the castable refractory once this time. A particularly long piece of stock got knocked off of my stand (out side of the forge) causing the end inside the forge to smack into the roof and make a nice gash the length of the forge. I have not re-coated with ITC100 yet. I did a patch job with plaster of Paris and sand. I'd like to get that out and replace with kastolite before re-coating with valuable ITC. Thank you all for the help and guidance!
  3. Me too! I'm by the fairgrounds. We should have a hammer in
  4. They accept scrap by the truck load!! And they just got in a huge pile of chain that appears to be wrought iron. I have scored bucket loads of bearings there, huge chunks of forklift fork, old wrenches, and they'll let you rummage. Granted it's not a huge yard, but they do have constantly revolving inventory, so you can go every day and see something new. And the guy in the cut up shop is very friendly, and pretty smart when it comes to metal, he keeps a pretty good mental inventory of what's where in the yard and what each piece is, or probably is. If you're going to sell to them I have heard more negative than positive reviews about they're prices paid for scrap. But buying from them, I have never had a bad experience.
  5. @Nik201 you could look into a brand new nimba, they're ate made in port orchard ($0.00 on shipping!!) And beautiful anvils. Some of the best new anvils available. I agree with the previous posts about that being a fairly large beginner anvil. I started on a 40# piece of rail road track and even now as my real anvil collection grows I occasionally use it. It's got the perfect size heel for bending fire strikers around. I am in Bremerton, by the fairgrounds. There are a few master smiths your husband could check out in the area, burnett family forge is the first that comes to mind. There is also a beginner class in Seattle, and I believe a master smith who works just off of the ferry landing in Seattle. @Kaylee sent you a message.
  6. Amazing shop. I love the pulleys and wheels and belts overhead. I don't know how to describe it other than steampunk and that's not the really the word I want. It's amazing and I love that old world engineering. Thank you for the pictures. One day I hope to have a shop that's just half that impressive and I'll be a happy camper!
  7. Is it done? I'm excited to see the finished product!! I like how you are so close to the pond, it would be nice to have a shop with a view of your own little pond. I'd fill it with koi and use it as my break area
  8. Sad day. There was a big Arm and Hammer (500#) for sale for a while up here for $3K but it had a crack all the way through the waist. I didn't bother looking at it when I say that it was broken in two pieces. I bet that PW could have easily gotten double that, maybe a touch more. And then I would have had some awkward explaining to do with the wife
  9. Let me know if you're ever interested in selling it I'd gladly come take it off your hands
  10. Man that is a massive anvil. I'd love to have a PW that big to go along with my little one. And that one looks almost new! Great looking anvil you have there!!
  11. I really want to look at a Delta anvil and play with one. Any idea how the base is connected to the top plate? I have heard there is a gasket between the 2 halves so that would make me think there are bolts etc that screw the bottom onto the top. If that were the case then the top and bottom becoming loose wouldn't be an issue. I really want to build a striking anvil face out of 5160 and then a large cast base from a high grade aluminum, it would give me the size of about a 700# sawyers block, but at less than 1/2 the weight. I'm just wondering if the base will absorb to much of the force. Please keep us updated if you get one of these as to the results.
  12. Next time I'm in Seattle I'll swing by the pottery supply store and check out this kiln shelf, so far the only problem I've had is being easily broken. I poked a long piece of stock through and knocked one of the back doors off and it shattered upon impact with the ground. Lucky me, I've got a 5 gal bucket full of fire place brick shop I used those to replace it, I really need to get the top part of my doors welded on!
  13. I like bridge anvils, I think they're neat. Don't know how well they would work as there is very little mass under the mid section but one day I will still add one to my shop.... Maybe use it as a foot rest?
  14. I picked up a piece of fork lift fork at the junk yard 2x5x24" about 70# for $20. It sets on the stand for my post vise and I use it as an upsetting block when needed. Seems like 1" might be a little on the thin side, and I have heard bad things from just welding 2 plates together. I'd look for a cheap piece of bigger stock.
  15. what

    Where are you located? I'd gladly come take that pesky PW off your hands to add to my PW collection for $200 I'll even load it up with a smile on my face.