Adirondacker

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About Adirondacker

  • Rank
    Junior Member

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  • Gender
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  • Location
    Thurman N.Y.

Converted

  • Location
    Thurman N.Y.
  • Biography
    outdoors person, independent thinker, Navy veteran, life learner, grandfather
  • Interests
    Hunting and fishing, making money on things I create, wood, stone and iron building
  • Occupation
    Sawyer, tree farm manager, self employed

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  1. I will need to exhaust my shop also, fumes from welding , the forge both coal and gas, plus cleaners and paints and at times engine exhausts. I will have to determine how many cubic feet in the shop and what the recommended air exchange for my shop, and what I'm doing in there, this will tell me how many C.F.M. I would need. Then I can get the right size exhaust fan. Adirondacker
  2. I just checked out Jet on line and am leaning towards the portable model as would suit my needs at present. There several dealers close to me so after Christmas will check them out. Was reading specs. but did not see anything on arbor size or tpi? would be interested if other blade manufactures would fit this model or if only Jet brands would work? Gary
  3. Thanks for replies, I know they can be pricey, but figure quality tools for quality work, cheap never works for me. did not realize Grizzly tools made in China?? gary
  4. I'm interested in adding a low rpm cutoff saw to my welding/ blacksmith shop, but have been unable to find any reviews on this. I had to place a order at Grizzly yesterday, so asked if they had any reviews on the saw they sell, they did not. I have looked on ytube, but its hard to tell how well they work or don't? Mostly I cut mild steel for different projects and am not happy with the band saw cuts, Anyone have any insight or experience with these miter saws for steel ? Thanks Gary
  5. Wondering if anyone knows if there is a distributors in the New York, New England area that carries Chili forges (two burner)? I'm trying to avoid the high shipping cost from Texas to New York? Or maybe someone who has one they would like to sell. Thanks in advance Adirondacker
  6. Joshua, By getting mad and fighting you have allowed someone else control your reactions, there are times when one has to fight but that should be controlled by you. I'm not here to lecture but to this point out. I promise you that these same guys will one day be appoaching you and asking "hey Joshua can you fix this for me?" And of course you can because you have been building a skill base they don't have, in addition to your formal education, plus they will glady pay you to fix it. Have seen this over and over in my life, just keep following your interests and keep learning. you'll see that what I tell you is true. Best regards Adirondacker
  7. This post was a good one, liked the answers as well as the question. I believe that knowledge isn't knowledge unless its shared. Skill is something akin to wisdom, this you get on your own. The observation by Steve Sells about teaching our kids for the test is spot on. Learning something and mastering it is plain hardwork, if it were easy, well everyone one would be doing it. Adiondacker
  8. Here in the Adirondacks in the late 1800's leather was shipped in from all over the world to be tanned. This was to be close to the hemlock forests. Lumber men would go into the woods in late spring and fell thousands and thousands of hemlocks leaving the tree still attached to the stump, then using spuds would peeled and stacked the hemlock bark to be drawn out the next winter with horses. They had to get out enough bark to last a whole year( short period to peel) . The bark was ground up to produce tanic acid used in the tanning process. As for the trees they were left to rot in the woods, when the supply was finally exhausted the tanning mills closed. As a young boy I boiled my traps in a big pot using Hemlock boughs and they turned black. Had forgotten about doing that thanks for the memory. Adirondacker
  9. Some funny comments, thanks for the laugh. Adirondacker
  10. I was at the local junk yard shopping for odds and ends, when I found lenghts of 8" pipe 10 ft long. I was thinking these would work for culverts in some of my woods roads, so I bought 4 or 5 at scrape price, Wish now I had bought all of them. These were water pipes used to make snow at a ski area, they are heavy walled so you can weld to them without burning thru. Never did use them for culverts, instead used two of them to extend flue pipe on outdoor furnace. Think someone here already hinted you towards scrape yard. I have seen old sign poles from business used for flues, I would check the junk yards and ask them to keep a look out for what you want, just a thought. Adirondacker
  11. Bad Roger is right they are for sticking joints for brick or block, some are made for joints in stone work, and are called strickers and seal the mortar tightly around the brick, block or stone. Adirondacker
  12. Thank you for offer to check out your web site, and to answer question I WILL have when I start this. Adirondacker
  13. Hello Beau, I'm Gary (Adirondacker) I live in Thurman N.Y. and run a sawmill business and tree farm, I have for a number years been slowly building a welding, blacksmith shop. I wish I was better at taking pictures. I'm to the point of installing ceiling, picked up used 4x8 of 2" foam board, it has a paper facing so will use white barn paint and install with fender washers and 3" screws. Next will be the lights and modine heater, then maybe I can finally build a fire in the forge. I work at this project when its to nasty out to be in the woods or sawing. I mostly read on here, and for the most part find this forum friendly, but very informative. Check out Martin's Lumber thur the Town of Thurman web page, We host a open house in June and have different talented folks come and demonstate their crafts and skills, just lined up a friend of mine who restores old barns and will teach basic timber framing and Id different jointery. Its my hope to have the smith operational by them and enough skill to demonstate, we will see? We firmly believe in sharing information and passing on skills, as well picking up some business along the way. Kids are the best as they will ask a question an adult is dying to ask but is to shy, is a good icebreaker. I have shop work this morning so better get at. Adirondacker
  14. Very nice job on screens, like the combination of Iron and stone, after looking at your work I got to thinking about a set of doors for my own fireplace. We don't use it much, but would like to. I did a search on this forumn last night on fireplace doors but came up with nothing? I want to build mine with glass fronts and have some ideas kicking around in my head, but seeing other works helps to focus my ideas. I sure someone here has done a project like this, I maybe using the wrong search statement? Adirondacker
  15. Since you do need a permit to build, ask if an Alaskan pour would work? developed to build on perma frost? so it floats when you get frost heaves. Would not attach shop to any other building as you shop will move and the other won't causing damage, just a thought. Adirondacker