vaporlock

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About vaporlock

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    Male
  • Location
    La Garrigue, France
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    too many

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  1. Hi Tempelhound, Agree, but I would think that to study edge retention when using a knife free hand would be difficult. too many variables to be able to draw conclusions. I was nevertheless less surprised by the fact that edge angle has a greater influence on edge retention than hardness.
  2. Hi All, I stumbled upon this study, started to read and had to share. http://knifesteelnerds.com/2018/06/18/maximizing-edge-retention/ very interesting and an excellent effort. vaporlock this will be moved to the knife making section.
  3. Hi all, Thanks for your kind words. All shaping is done by hammer including the point and bevel since for me this is the most difficult part of the forging. I try to leave a 0.5-1.0 mm edge on the bevel for hardening. The original bar was 14 mm octagonal XC75. As far as the hammer dips go, I just have to get better control and hammer more evenly, especially to get an even spine. I still have a hard time predicting the shape of the point and i am still going back and forth between ‘shaping the knife then hammering the bevel and continuously straightening the spine as a consequence’ or ‘shaping the point inverse and letting the tip come up as you forge the bevel’. The olive wood is from a tree which died in 1956 when an exceptional cold in this area decimated the olive trees. Managed to grab it before it went into my neighbour’s fireplace.
  4. yup, I did not pay any attention to how the pic was taken . these are the pics i take to keep a history of what i have done (which i forget to do most of the time) they are simply taken on my workbench. i will take more care with composition next time. thanks
  5. Hi All, It has been a while since I have posted some pics. In the mean time, i keep on forging but how are things coming along? you tell me : XC75 forged as far as possible olive handle with a bit of liner to compensate "hammer dips" in the handle area. I am not ready yet to polish up the whole knife, I still like to see the forge in it. vaporlock
  6. very nice haul especially knowing what people ask for some worn out tongs on "le bon coin". the anvil looks to be in very good condition. did you try the rebound? nice size, nice weight once you have it in its proper place. I gave a knife to a German friend of mine once who introduced me to the tradition of making the gift a transaction by paying a token coin for the knife. He told me he picked it up when he sailed the oceans after setting of from home when about 16 years old. he is 80 now. His explanation, you do not give "a weapon" you can only buy or make one it should be your choice and not a gift. I picked this tradition up since it made sense to me and when I would ask people for a coin in exchange for a knife, some would understand it as "avoiding the cutting of a friendship " tradition and some would not understand at all but nobody other than my buddy ever gave me the "weapon" explanation.
  7. haha, yeah my good ol Dutch heritage. a decent pair of clogs . not advisable for forging though. to much space between foot and clog for scale to drop into.
  8. Oh man, I just stumbled upon a lucky picture. the writing is a lot clearer "Tarreria Farge" . The above anvil is displayed in the entrance hall of the "tarreria bonjean" knifefactory .All of a sudden I have a lot more info. Antoine tarrerias was an anvil maker born in 1838 in Thiers . His father was named Jean Terrerias and his mother was Anne Farge. No idea yet who made the anvil but it should put its date of manufature mid to end 1800. However I do not see a year nor a weight on mine. More digging to do in the manufacture of anvils in that area. vaporlock
  9. Pas mal ton Français, pas mal du tout. I think that her curves will be sufficient for the moment, no need for the "bigorne" yet. She looks more like she was chipped out of a block of steel than cast. strange also the non symmetry between the front and the back. Unfortunately I can not really make out the writing. It does not make a lot of sense to me.
  10. Hi All, As promised, some detailed pictures of this anvil. she is crooked and weird and beautiful. Not a straight plane or angle on it. she is all curves and legs. Pritchel hole has been drilled and squared on the table side she is on the heavy side, liftable but not portable (by me). She rings like a bell (but less so than the little brooks) has no dead spots . Beautiful, I look forward to putting her to work, I just know she will make me sweat. Vaporlock
  11. Hmm, they where visible yesterday. I'll edit the post and see if i can fix it.
  12. Hi All, As promised, some detailed pictures of this anvil. she is crooked and weird and beautiful. Not a straight plane or angle on it. she is all curves and legs. Pritchel hole has been drilled and squared on the table side she is on the heavy side, liftable but not portable (by me). She rings like a bell (but less so than the little brooks) has no dead spots . Beautiful, I look forward to putting her to work, I just know she will make me sweat. Vaporlock
  13. A great new year to all and a BIG thanks for the time everybody takes to make this site a great read.
  14. Hi all, I think the vid Frosty refers to is called "Swinging a Forging Hammer the Helm Way" In case someone is interested. vaporlock
  15. Well, I would like to know what this type of anvil is called but most of all I wanted to know which type of metal worker used it. I do think the three hardy holes will prove to be useful (if I can get over the reflex of taking the hardies out of the anvil) .