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I Forge Iron

Momatt

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About Momatt

  • Rank
    Senior Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Near St. Louis mo
  • Interests
    Woodworking and green woodworking, traditional archery beekeeping gardening hobby farming hunting sawmill old tractors. Just getting into black smithing and intrigued by the possibilities.

    I am an engineer to pay the bills. Blessed with a big family 5 kids and wonderful wife.

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  1. Enjoyed the videos Joe. You got some pretty good rebar! Skillfully welded. I enjoy watching metal move with a stiker. A smith with a good striker isn't too far off from a smith with a smaller power hammer.
  2. Thomas, your question is what I ask myself all the time. Same reason that awful looking billet is held together with a hose clamp!!! I need to go buy a welder! benona, I will post the link. Would love to hear yours and others thoughts on the forge weld tack. It looks about 300 degrees below welding temp!!! Please watch the first 39 seconds of this video. How on earth did he get it to stick? moderators I apologize if I’m not supposed to post a link. I know there is a heat reserve in larger stock but man, I never get anything to stick if I don’t hit as soon as it kisses the anvil. I rarely waste the time even to brush before the initial weld. Never seen such a relaxed approach to a forge weld. My welds even if it’s just an axe bit always look like drop tong welds on skinny stock where you move like a mad man moving as fast as you can and it’s too cold a few seconds out of the forge.
  3. Thanks David my tabs were way to small I think. Probably 1/8 inch. Gonna try this again shoot for half inch.
  4. I want to try a welded face wrought hammer. I scrounged up some wrought, mostly half inch round bar and forge welded it up. I thought that would be the tricky part but I have a very nice solid 1.4 pound billet about an 1-3/8 square. Should not have punched the eye yet but at least I remembered that before I drifted it. Can’t get a piece of 1084 to stick to the face. My forge door isn’t wide enough to get it in there vertical with the steel face sitting on top. I tried to make the little chiseled tabs on the face but it’s not working. I’m going to try getting the hammer piece white hot quick Setting on the anvil vertically then going back to the forge for the face and quickly setting it on and tapping next. Fun project but not very successful yet. There is a YouTube video of a guy doing that and I looks way to cold but sticks like magic.
  5. Very nice. I am curious how thick are the bars you are forge welding together? I have been messing around with this technique and any thinner than a scant 1/2 inch is hard to weld. I end up grinding off a lot because if I try to forge thin welds start cutting loose. Love to hear about your technique and observations. Matt
  6. That is pretty neat. I'm surprised to see a weld there, that is a particular piece of equipment where a weld break might lead to bad consequences. In those days after the first shot, things really got ugly and those bayonets were basically the soldiers only weapon.
  7. If you shoot a video on your iPhone you can view the individual frames and do a screenshot. I’ve gotten some impressive photos that way of my cannon . The fire cloud exists for like 1/1000 of a second and to your eye doesn’t look like this. Be a great way to catch the flux shooting out of a forge weld!
  8. Friend gave me the springs and sway bar from his high school car, a 1983 cutlass. I cut the end of the sway bar off and tried to leave it recognizable as possible. A heavy duty opener for sure. He will be delighted.
  9. TH, I am very interested in this and will have to read up on it. Is the cutter used freehand on a handle or does it sit in a bolder more like a plane? It left a great finish!
  10. I would love to touch mammoth fur! They have captured my imagination. The greatest beast of another age. I have some mammoth ivory. When I was a boy a family friend had a wonderful collection of Indian artifacts. He lived older stuff paleo percussion flaked. He had an axe that in profile was shaped like a mammoths head and back. It gave me chills when he shined a light and it cast a mammoth shadow ! He called it an effigy axe.
  11. I am very sorry for you loss. Abby must have been very special. If you are lucky, you get one like that at some point in your life. Frosty the lucky is a good name for you. When my grandfather died, he lingered in the boundary lands between this world and the next for about 45 minutes. At one point he threw back his head and laughed. My aunt asked what was going on and he said I see scooby! There are dogs in heaven! I’ll tell you what, if scooby made it then grace abounds. I remember him he was a horrible yappy Pomeranian mutt that grandpa pretended to despise but actually loved deeply. Here’s to all our loyal loving friends that have passed on. All virtues of man but none of his vices.
  12. I like how you do your handle scales proud of the tang. Its a beautiful knife. Did you grind or forge in the fuller?
  13. Thomas, A few years ago I really got in axes, I was buying heads and making hafts. At that time I made a shave horse and was using draw knifes. That is a marvelous way to quickly shape wood. I remember thinking wow this is like a bandsaw! I also used a spokeshave to finish up and that is a sweet efficient way to make a handle. Since I don't have a shave horse currently I have been using a lie-neilsen block plane with an adjustable mouth, easier to navigate around the blank. I set it for a heavy cut and in the oak I have been using it does a pretty good job. You have me thinking that I need to make another shave horse! Here is my old tulip poplar horse that rotted too close to the chicken house
  14. I think you are both right. The book says it was a carpenters axe. I have done some hewing with broad axes (in fact in my profile pic I am doing just that) and its likely my unfamiliarity with it that makes me think it crap! A Japanese craftsman might say the same about the finest western push style dovetail saw. I think the original was struck as it appears to be peened or mushroomed. Perhaps a 12 year old viking was yelled at by his dad for mistreating it, ha ha.
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