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  2. Les L

    Barn Find

    That's the best part of travelling, unfortunately my travel for work doesn't give me the time to visit, but that will change in a few months when it will be for my enjoyment and I will be setting the schedules. I hope to be able to meet and visit with some of you on IFI in the near future.
  3. I cut some big rubber bands from an innertube (just cut straight across to make a ring) and wrapped those around the handle next to the knobs.
  4. It's was towards Seward, probably the Kenai peninsula... I know when we took a fairy on the move to Alaska, it was 3 days and we seen glaciers and it was unbelievable, to roll into that type of scenery, coming from hot humid Georgia at the time.we also went somewhere when my grandparents visited, we took a train to a small mining village and we gold panned, which we went gold panning other places as well... I'm curious what's in ur picture? My eyes aren't as sharp as they once were... Oh I see it's a female moose... these were all over cherry hill, people would call the guys in the navy blue van trucks and they would come out and attempt to trans them and move them to the back side of base...i seen her back there, I thought she was a cow ...whoops...i watched some guys wirh my friend try to trans a tall lanky calf one time and when they shot him in the back hip, he turned straight towards me, I turned my bike around and he pursued to follow me all the way to my house at a very generously slow trot, I was so scared... i imagine he was pretty scared, just trying to eat and the he got stung in the hiney...
  5. I made rough split crosses and nails for my three kids for Easter. I left the crosses rough because I wanted them to be reminded that the cross wasn't done nice pretty thing, hopefully helping remind them of the sacrifice that was done for all of us to be free. I made the nails to help with that reminder.
  6. Thanks, Das. I was talking with a donor some months back who was complaining about the lack of period-correct forks for American Revolution reenactors (her husband is a member of a fife-and-drum corps and sews all their reenacting clothes by hand!), and then I saw an old fork in an antique shop that inspired me to give this a try. Here’s a photo of that original. I love the decoration, which is all done with the corner of a chisel.
  7. Today
  8. I'll leave the suckers to the MIG welder and stick with regular old mild steel for the tentacles. Nice fork John. The tines turned out great.
  9. We should start calling you the dragon dentist. Very cool.
  10. I would love to build a shop, as I don't even have as much as a carport to work in. That is why all my machine shop equipment still sits at my parent's estate. I am near an industrial area, and asked my power company about power for a shop. Turns out I have a switch across the street, and I can get 480V which would be excellent for my big welders. $12,000 to run it under the street, and install a 75kw transformer. This was at the height of the metals market, so not sure what the cost would be today.
  11. *We* could talk for days; there were "can openers" but very specialized weapons used by specialized people---like modern snipers. Some people also get mislead by "Bearing Swords" hugely over sized versions that were only used in Parades or displayed to show the Might or Right of the crown or an office of the crown. But Hollywood is to blame for a lot of common misconceptions----Remember "The 13th Warrior" when they showed AB's character as not being able to pick up and swing a sword that WOULD have weighed about as much as a 2 liter bottle of soda? Then had him grind off the only hardenable part to make it into a style not used for centuries later? (Using a grindstone not used for centuries later too.) Or in "Pirates of the Caribbean" when they are making a big fuss about "folded steel"---when the cooks knives may have been folded steel (shear steel) as well? We inherited a lot of this from the Victorians and what I call "Wish Fulfillment" documentation. Reading the original sources and you hear of folks vaulting into the saddle in full armour or even swimming a moat in maille. The easiest way to identify whether an ax was used for chopping wood or for chopping people is that the wood cutting axes generally were heavier. Most soldiers in early medieval armies were peasant levies armed with spear. Swords and armour were a mark of Nobility who trained for warfare as a major part of their life.
  12. Dropped my son off at the dentist, and they gave me a box with a couple of pounds of lead foil from dental x-ray film capsules.
  13. Welcome! Which way out of Las Vegas? Pahrump? I am the other way myself.
  14. I'll echo what Mr. Powers has said. Most "real" swords were under 3 lb, with 3 lb being an unusually large specimen. Even things like falchions, which are considered chopping blades were still in the 2-2.5 lb range. You can't go by modern replicas because most were built with the assumtion of their having been heavy. Anybody who ever made a heavy sword obviously never had to wield one for any length of time in battle. Remember, other than those made for ceremonial purposes, swords were battlefield weapons meant to be used for extended periods. They had to be practical and usable. Same with armor. Aside from parade armor and some heavier examples of tournament armor (which was never meant to be used on the actual battlefield), a full suit of 15th-16th century battlefield plate armor was usually only 40-50 lb, with some outliers up to 55 or 60. Remember too that swords were not made to cut through armor. They don't do that - never could, so they don't need to be heavy enough for that. Accuracy and speed with a sword is infinitely more useful than impact force. And battle axes were also far thinner and lighter than most people, movies, and fantasy portray too. Think along the lines of hatchet head weight on a longer handle, NOT chopping axe weight. But I digress... (Sorry, you just happened to touch on a topic on which I could speak for days...)
  15. people tend to get caught up in the Everybody knows type of information, same in my day job as electrician, so many DIY people mess it up because they knew it was done this way....
  16. Wow. That seems like a nightmare to keep track of all those scroll parts and organize the whole thing. Well done, sir!
  17. Can't remember if I noted a couple of weeks ago that I plugged a couple of the holes in my NARB with kaowool, and drastically reduced the backfiring-at-low-pressure problem. I may block one more (or change which ones are blocked), as that does seem to have created a slightly cooler spot in the middle of the forge and/or a slightly hotter spot at the back (although I freely admit that that might be a function of the internal pyrodynamics).
  18. I only knew my paternal grandparents. Grandfather raised 10 children with his forge, a grist mill and 40 acres. Dad was in the Military so I wasn't able to spend much time with my grandparents. I spent the summer with them in the early 70's, granddad was 85, I was 13-14, he was still farming and had about 20 head of cattle. We were up every morning before daylight, I pumped water into trough while he fed the cattle and grandmother milked the cow, then back home for breakfast, fresh eggs, milk and home made bread, butter and preserves, so we could eat and get into the field at sunrise to pick corn all day by hand to put into the crib for the cattle's winter feed. Best summer I ever had, but I've always been told I wasn't very smart.
  19. JHCC

    Barn Find

    I'm on the road for work quite a bit as well, but I've been lucky in that my rambles have given me the opportunity to get together with a number of IFI members and even to spend some time together forging.
  20. I have to disagree with Frosty on this one. I read that stamp as “J. Derrida”, which would make this anvil postmodern.
  21. By 'get me started' I meant starting to gather first pieces of equipment. Never did any of this work before. Reading a lot, looking at other peoples ideas. I did woodworking for years, so have some modest abilities in that respect, but very limited in any metalworkings. Weight of anvil is 55 lbs.
  22. Les L

    Barn Find

    Frosty, Thanks for the help. Everything is there except the handles, I'll work on cleaning them up and making handles this weekend. Work has me on the road most of this week.
  23. Had to go on another hunt a few months back. Got my arm scorched a bit from the caustic saliva on these beasts, but I was victorious in the end! Scrub and brush however you like, you're just not getting the stains out after they've been baked deep into the enamel for years and years!
  24. I had trouble getting the refractory between the rods due to the large grit in it. I used mizzou. Had to push little bits between the rods with a thin knife blade. PLA is brittle, so be careful. You may want to try to sift the dry refractory through a screen to remove larger particles. Vibrating didn’t work for me..,the grit was too big/space between rods too small and by the time I got enough refractory between the rods it was starting to set up. It was worth it though, my burner is great! I don’t think you want the rods to flair for a ribbon burner. I was thinking of doing the opposite to push the flame away from the block and keep it cooler, but it doesn’t ever backburn, so not necessary. Great use of 3D printing! Dan R
  25. Hi Bart, I did a file test and the face is hard, but i can't indetify the face plate. Thanks for your info.
  26. Well, Jen is correct. Once you develop the skill to turn scrolls by eye, the time difference between using a jig, or the mark one eyeball becomes moot. Thus, in the long run, using the mark one eyeball means more variation and freedom of expression and along with this the ability to charge more per lineal foot due to it being unique. I say this strictly because the best way to max economics using jigs is to have one jig fits all, and it is used all the time. Thus in that space defined by code 4"×32", a production shop needs only one jig and one setup. The benefit is it takes very little time to train a helper to use that jig. However what you lose is one off creativity by the job. So the choice becomes production vs comission. This is the difference, and the choice made is always the correct choice. Thus there should never be any conflict between the two pathways. Obviously this is a great simplification. The question should be just how do you bridge the learning curve and get to the place where the time difference between jigs and the mark one eyeball isnt an issue? And how much learning time does it actually take to get to that point? Well, who in the blacksmithing world bends iron without a jig on a daily basis? A Farrier. Every shoe is shaped to fit a specific hoof without a jig and absolutely must be done in a timely manner. By the end of the first summer you are either fairly competant, or there will be no next summer. The next question is how long does it take a farrier who decides to become a " blacksmith" to grasp the idea that an "s" scroll is just a weird hoof and apply his/her experience and confidence to freehand matched scrolls in railings or whatever. Lol, sometimes without a hint from some blacksmith, never! Thinking out of the box isnt easy. And Frosty, when I read the origional post, he was asking advice on how to match scrolls. I figgured if he was using a jig, he would have asked how to use a jig. Since he didnt, i guessed he was doing them freehand. Thus so many posts and tips on freehand. And nowhere did i see any comments on freehand good, jigs bad.
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