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  2. I prefer dirt except dirt becomes mud when it rains (forge is outside). Soon it will be brick. Not for comfort. Strictly to satisfy the fire chief so I can get a permit to forge outside during burn bans. I would go with concrete, but the brick is free. Paver-base and sand isn’t but isn’t that expensive.
  3. Just checking; there's a reason it's "stainless" instead of "stain-never".
  4. I like those big ones! I've got some 1" or 1 1/4" rebar. Might be fun to make a 3 ft snake
  5. Today
  6. Fantastic. What did you order for valving? Northern tool will ship to American Samoa? That is pretty good.
  7. I'm dirt around the forge works. Cement with a light color in the bench/finish area and machine shop area. Welding area is cement as well. I call cement and concrete the same thing though from what people tell me it's different.
  8. I ordered a shop air kit from Northern Priority Mail 3 months ago...it got misdirected and ended up on ocean mail, finally got it about a week ago. The compressor is installed and wired already. I still need to get my valving, but the project is still alive.
  9. Right now I'm still in the information gathering/planning stages. Passivation is one of the last things in the sequence to be concerned about, but probably a good idea to clean up any free iron on the surface from hammer, anvil, etc.
  10. The main reason for asking that question was to determine whether it was likely that the chromium content would be diluted enough to fall below the threshold for remaining corrosion resistant on the outer layers of the billet/blade.
  11. The extruder tips are pretty much hollow, and only have a lead-in that's not much longer than the diameter of the orifice. That being said, I have an assortment that I'd like to try using anyways. Thanks for putting that together! Edit didn't take, I'd also suggest looking at glue dispensing tips. I snagged some on ebay, but haven't gotten to look at their internal construction yet. They also come in a variety of small orifice diameters.
  12. Other elements can migrate at high temperatures through a solid phase weld; HOWEVER some of them may require *years* to migrate as far as carbon does in minutes at the same temperature..
  13. Thanks for sharing the info and pics. I may have to try that with some O1. I have a couple questions though for anyone who knows about these things. Do other elements such as chromium migrate through the steel the way carbon does? Does carbon migrate into stainless roughly the same way it does with non-stainless alloys? Is there a good way to reasonably predict the ending carbon content of the edge material using this method. Can we use the ratio of starting volumes of the alloys and their starting carbon content to get pretty close to the carbon content after forge welding and forging?
  14. I'm interested to see if others have different uses. I have seen them used as headers for large "display" nails too now that I think of it---the 3' long ones! And of course the through holes make it easier to mount them on something as a weight..."How far can you swim carrying a swage block?" Simple answer is: "How deep is the lake?"
  15. ThomasPowers... Sorry yes, Wear. Thinking and typing at the same time...At work doing a utility design...
  16. Thomas, thanks. That makes sense. I just don't do mortise and tenon work at that scale. It would make more sense if I were repairing steam locomotives or traction engines. "By hammer and hand all arts do stand."
  17. Minwax has worked for me , for pendants. With the surface cleaned up and optionally blued, wax looks nice and holds up nicely. I have some forged pendants that are 20+ years old now, and are still looking good. I have never, nor will I ever, spray paint a wearable forged item. When the paint starts to flake off, it will become a throw away item to many consumers.
  18. Monkey tool for truing tenons on large projects. (Extremely very rare in my case; But I have used it for that. May be using it more as I forge more stake anvils from Sledge heads and need to size the shafts.)
  19. OK, this is a beginner question from an old smith but how and for what purpose do you use the round, square, and rectangular holes in the face of a swage block? I have never been in a situation where I looked at my swage block and said, "Aha, that round/square/rectangular hole is just what I need for the project I'm working on!" Maybe it's the sort of things I make don't require this sort of thing. "By hammer and hand all arts do stand."
  20. Posted by G-son I took the liberty of making a list of Mikeys suggested MIG tip vs. pipe sizes, and added the actual pipe diameters (instead of the schedule 40 pipe sizes that aren't the real size) and the tip size in percent of the mix tube diameter. I thought it could be useful for people who build burners using other kinds of pipe or tubing, and the gas jet vs. mix tube size may be useful for people building other size burners than the listed ones - something in the ~4.0-4.6% range seems to be right for most of the listed sizes, possibly more on smaller burners and less on larger ones. I just gathered the numbers in one place, everyone gets to draw their own conclusions and use it as they see fit. The information was already out there, I just try to make it a bit easier to compare and use. Original post ----------------------- I just thought of using 3D printer nozzles as gas jets for small burners. I've just made a little research, but they seem to be available down to 0.2mm diameter. Not sure about the internal shape or length of the narrow passage, probably varies between different manufacturers. Do they seem suitable? Availability seems good, price okay (but not great, like the mig tips).
  21. I've done some forgewelding in the coal forge and had some forge welding done to my workpiece inside a propane forge.
  22. G-son

    Burners 101

    I took the liberty of making a list of Mikeys suggested MIG tip vs. pipe sizes, and added the actual pipe diameters (instead of the schedule 40 pipe sizes that aren't the real size) and the tip size in percent of the mix tube diameter. I thought it could be useful for people who build burners using other kinds of pipe or tubing, and the gas jet vs. mix tube size may be useful for people building other size burners than the listed ones - something in the ~4.0-4.6% range seems to be right for most of the listed sizes, possibly more on smaller burners and less on larger ones. I just gathered the numbers in one place, everyone gets to draw their own conclusions and use it as they see fit. The information was already out there, I just try to make it a bit easier to compare and use.
  23. swapped the nipple.i looked into it and its rare but possible that the propane may corrode the ragulater over time. im gonna see if this set pressure gauge works if not ima buy a new one
  24. I think they mean worn as in "to wear" like jewelry; rather than worn as worn out. My suggestion would be to make it from stainless and passivate with citric acid.
  25. This was posted in another thread for a item to show the patina and yet protect the object. There are several types of wax that can be used. Check to see if it is food grade if you are worried.
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