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  2. Kandar

    Burners 101

    Ill have some time to tinker with it this weekend. I have some 0.023s an plenty of torch tip file sets so ill see how that goes. I have the new jets setup with the 1/8 nipple threaded for mig tips. They need a little more clean up and run a polish on the ports. Works for engines. Why not burners! Ill be pulling them out to try some flare adjustment. I will get some pics of the flames and different nozzle options. I found a perfect 12 degree mandrel in the scrap yard that is 3 inches wide at the base. Makes nice flares easily. Thanks for any assistance.
  3. I've been smithing off and on since 1993. I learned a lot from the MOB (Mid-ohio Blacksmiths) and Thomas Powers in particular.

    Currently I am doing some work with a reenactor group.

  4. Sharp tungsten

    Any steam hammers available?

    30 bucks or so by the PA state boiler inspector. I have my own sawmill so firewood and sawdust for fuel is free. I'm a CWI and former union boilermaker so maintenance for the little boiler should be manageable.
  5. ThomasPowers

    Any steam hammers available?

    Impressive! How much are the yearly mandatory inspections going to run you on that? (based on where I've lived of course---YMMV)
  6. ThomasPowers

    It followed me home

    Is the interface curved or flat? If flat then a dished thrust washer is not going to do much. If it's curved then a throw out bearing can stand in for the washer.
  7. RogerrogerD

    It followed me home

    This is where I think there should be a washer, but isn’t
  8. Sharp tungsten

    Any steam hammers available?

    Yep, I am sticking with steam. Already acquired a small 15 hp vertical boiler.
  9. RogerrogerD

    It followed me home

    Thanks TP. I intend to do just that, and have mostly got there, apart from the pivot nut and bolt which are tight. I’ll leave it in wd40 over night and try in the morning. Any thoughts on the need for a thrust washer?
  10. Today
  11. marcusb

    Post vice I.D.

    I love that place. It was a long drive when I lived in NW Ohio and even longer now I am in the SE part of the state. I have not been there in over 5 years now! I'm glad to hear they are still up and running.
  12. Sly

    Show me your snakes

    didn't know this was a thing, ok definitely need a how to reference on this someone PM me
  13. ThomasPowers

    Tooling

    I have one. Mine came with just a flat die on it and I had a friend with a lathe make me a tool holder with a 1" hole and a set screw. Unfortunately it's at my other shop---200 miles north (and in a different country from me right now). So I can't get any pictures for a while. I've found a number of RR Bolts and dome headed trailer hitch balls that fit my tool holder and made some S-1 slitting/drifting tools from broken pharmaceutical punches. I use a lot of top swages with the flat die and have even used the "modern" replaceable tips for rock drills for patterning. I have some thick bars of steel on the table as my table has a central hole, Fun to watch a 3" thick 4" wide bar flex when the die hits it! We've done coining with it too. Note I slipped some pipe insulation on the dependent handles to mitigate the THWAP effect when you are working intently on setting things up and the screw unwinds... Can I be so crass as to inquire how much that set you back?
  14. ThomasPowers

    Show me your snakes

    Naw you stick it in a vise and twist it in line with a pipe wrench...I also have several swages I use for doing the curve in, that seems to help me vs using the step on the anvil. I had some old worn light duty pipe wrenches show up in a box of stuff I bought at a garage sale. I had much better ones for plumbing use and when I was trying to line up the seam in the early days I thought of them...
  15. joeli

    Tooling

    Everybody, I just had the good fortune to pick up a #2 Hopkins fly press. I need to make a top tool/die holder for it. I was thinking that having dies with a 1" shank makes the most sense. I'd rather make it once and be done, so in that spirit I'm trying to do some research before I start. I've found very little on the web. I have lathe, mill, and welder so I can pretty much make anything. If anyone out there has this press, I would greatly appreciate seeing a photo or sketch of what they did or have. Thanks everybody, joel-
  16. ThomasPowers

    How to forge a flatter.. No swage block used..

    Very traditional looking piece!
  17. ThomasPowers

    A shed clean up - *sigh*

    I've seen it go both ways; stuff like that scrapped because folks don't understand it. I've also seen folks that think it must be made from gold under all that rust. I remember on auction where a fellow paid top dollar for a mint condition anvil for one that had a crack from the hardy hole to the edge and other evident signs of abuse. He then was paying US$30-40 a piece (early 1990's $$) for some swages that didn't fit that anvil. I asked him about it and he just was going to paint them black and put them by his fireplace....
  18. Boiled linseed oil is basically an oil based paint minus the colouring agents. It dries hard. Plain Linseed oil will get gummy and take a long time to polymerize and harden and so be gummy. Paint is designed to protect. Inside: waxing may be enough---depends on the shop and the climate! Me I live in a dry climate and haven't used anything the last 15 years. The patina already there seems to guard from fresh rusting.
  19. ThomasPowers

    It followed me home

    I generally take the moving leg off the vise and clean it and the interior cheeks of the pivot and oil and put it back in place. Several times I have found "strange" pitting inside the joint and was glad I cleaned and smoothed it out.
  20. ThomasPowers

    Milling off anvil face...

    There are a lot of folks out there wanting to make their old anvil into the BEST condition possible just when they are getting started; the problem is that they don't really know what is "best" when they have no experience in the field. We often mention the Dunning-Kruger effect---when you don't know much about something you are more likely to assume you know more than you do. (Not know how much you don't know.) A lot like teenagers in some ways. With a bit of experience you can make informed decisions about your tooling.
  21. That is a bull set. Think of it like a 8lbs + chisel with a wood handle attached to it. It is used to break stone. You have one person using the handle to hold it while the striker strikes the bull set with a sledgehammer. I use this tool regularly in my everyday job. I don't know what steel it's made of but it's tough. It will of been hardened and tempered originally but work would of possibly work hardened it also. I would clean up the edges of the face and use it like a Nepalese blacksmith using a sledgehammer as an anvil. Here are some picks of the one I use at work.
  22. Matt Watson

    Milling off anvil face...

    ThomasPowers I'm not familiar with 4340 I'll have to look that one up I pretty much know nothing when it comes to metallurgy. As far as my anvil I bought it online and had it shipped to me. I did look at pictures but at the time I knew nothing about anvils except the old ones that were forged were supposed to be the best of the best along with hand crank blowers and post vices. That was my general understanding at the time. I still think my anvil is superior in alot of ways compared to others that I have seen in person now that I have located people in my area with the same interest. But either way I have decided I'm definitely not going to do anything to it except maybe make a plate for the top to straighten longer stock. Or I may just save up and get a flat one that is around a hundred pounds or three RR track if I can find a piece I haven't had any luck with that in my area.
  23. RogerrogerD

    It followed me home

    Just picked up a nice 6 1/2 “ leg vice and a No 15 Bradson pillar drill. Both not functioning but 5 mins work in them and I've spotted the issues. The pivot bracket on the vice is seized up preventing the jaws from moving but a swim overnight in wd40 magic juice should fix that. Its the one on the floor. The pawl spring was missing on the pillar drill but otherwise apart from rust and grime all working. Heres the pics . The pillar drill has a 50” dia flywheel and stands 2 1/2 feet tall. On the vice there is no thrust washer - can I ask advice from those here if I need one? Feeling pleased with myself £70 the pair, and plenty to keep me busy these long winter evenings
  24. rocketman_k

    It followed me home

    Acquired this little beauty........the very end of the bick on my main anvil was missing when I bought it which means for some work I need something smaller. I usually use a large round drift to form smaller things around but have always wanted something to fit the Hardy hole. I love the fact that this has it's own hardy hole (Now looking for a tiny anvil that will fit into a 1/2" hardy hole" I don't see any markings on it, I'll give it a light wire brushing to see if anything is revealed It doesn't go very far into the hardy hole on the mail anvil but I'll try it as it is before contemplating reducing the size of the stem a little.
  25. rocketman_k

    Small Fly Press Restoration project

    Thomas: Thanks for the advice on making the handle....no power hammer here so I'll have to do it the hard way. (Thinking of enlisting a friend to be my striker for a few hours) Irondragon: Plus Gas is a commercially available dismantling fluid available here in UK......it's the best I've tried and has never failed yet, I find if I leave it overnight I very rarely need to use heat when dismantling rusted fixings etc. (That said I've not tried Acetone and ATF, I have some acetone somewhere so will give it a try)
  26. I've cleaned up one old post vise and now I'm working on another one. What do you guys put on your vises to keep them from rusting right away? I've seen people use boiled linseed oil but I've read that it can get gummy after a while.
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