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Tomahawk Drift


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#1 coltpax

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Posted 20 September 2008 - 11:14 PM

Anyone know a place that sells a decent tomahawk drift? Looked on ebay and they had cast drifts, but not sure the quality of those tools. Thanks for any help,
Coltpax

#2 Donnie

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 08:56 AM

Kayne and Son.Blacksmiths Depot

#3 Bentiron1946

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 07:40 PM

I have also wondered about the cast ductile iron drifts and that is what for sale on Ebay and Blacksmith Depot. Has anybody used them?

#4 Jmercier

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 08:10 PM

I know this doesn't answer your question but just for something to chew on as to whether you actually need a 'tomahawk' drift. Some good advice that I've used was given by Joe Szilaski at the 07 ABS hammer-in in Vermont, that if you're making a tomahawk for use and not for the art of it, drift the hole square or circular and not tear drop shaped like the 'typical' tomahawk drift, because it makes re-handling it in the field easy when it's very hard to shape a branch to a tear drop when in the woods

Edited by Jmercier, 21 September 2008 - 08:20 PM.

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#5 coltpax

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 08:16 PM

I might see about ordering ne from kayne & son. It says its cast ductile iron like the ones off of ebay. I reckon when I get it, I'll post back here saying how it does.

#6 CurlyGeorge

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 08:35 PM

I have one that I bought from this man. It works great. I've used it several times.
Duck's Nest Iron Works, Pemberton, Ohio. Phone (937) 498-1253.

#7 rthibeau

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 08:42 PM

The cast ductile iron drifts will all mushroom sooner rather than later as they are too soft. Some of the alloy steels are much better for that purpose. Posted Image

Edited by rthibeau, 21 September 2008 - 08:50 PM.

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#8 Blackmtfarrier

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 10:07 PM

I know this doesn't answer your question but just for something to chew on as to whether you actually need a 'tomahawk' drift. Some good advice that I've used was given by Joe Szilaski at the 07 ABS hammer-in in Vermont, that if you're making a tomahawk for use and not for the art of it, drift the hole square or circular and not tear drop shaped like the 'typical' tomahawk drift, because it makes re-handling it in the field easy when it's very hard to shape a branch to a tear drop when in the woods


You're right Jmercier, all the research I've done tells me that most original tomahawk type trade axes made in the 17th 18th and 19th centuries were drifted or mandreled with a round tapered drift/mandrel so the natives could just cut a branch and fit it in the field.

#9 basher

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 02:59 AM

I have had a couple of ductile drifts and they both worked fine. they are drifts and not punches!
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#10 A.S.T.

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 08:57 AM

I purchased a drift from Kayne and Sons and am very pleased with it. the top has mushroomed a bit but I keep it cleaned up whith the belt sander and it has not been a problem.
Aaron

#11 ThomasPowers

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 10:41 AM

Guess my reply from yesterday is in the bit bucket.

I use structural steel alignment pins to do the heavy work drifting---good quality steel and I buy them at the fleamarket when I can find them cheap. Then I use my tomahawk drift for only the last couple of heats to get the shape down for a hawk handle. (same thing with my ductile hammer handle drifts for that matter)

Preserves the drift and I can wallop the pins without worrying!
Thomas Psychotic Psychobabblonian Powers

#12 me miller

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 08:50 AM

You can also find drifts and fancy curly maple handles at Hawkinsknifemakingsupplies,com.

#13 s meyer

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 09:56 AM

Why not make your own drift. I did mine out of a large pin made of good steal and heat treated it. It's a little work but well worth it.

#14 Dan C

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 10:39 AM

I have the drift from Kayne & Sons, after 10 or so hawks the struck end has mushroomed.  Can the ductile iron be forged back into shape or should I grind away the mushroomed edges?

 

Attached File  IMG_0931.JPG   32KB   3 downloads



#15 kubiack

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 09:46 AM

Brent Bailey lists one his website. It's more than the one for Blacksmith's Depot but forged from tool steel.



#16 ThomasPowers

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 11:10 AM

Grind Ductile; do not try to forge!

 

Have you been hitting it with a brass or lead hammer?


Thomas Psychotic Psychobabblonian Powers

#17 Dan C

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 11:50 AM

Oops no, was hitting it with a tool steel hammer.  I can say I've gotten my money's worth out of it and will continue to use it for a while after grinding the edges.  I've got a suitable piece of 5160 that I'll forge into a new drift and use this one as a model.

 

Thanks Kubiack for the Brent Bailey suggestion, nice things on that website.



#18 eggwelder

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 08:32 PM

i`m new here, this will be my second post. i`ve made several tomahawks, all with round holes except 2. one is a tear drop shape, and the other rectangle, more on that one later. the teardrop shape i found very difficult to make handles for. maybe my taper was off, who knows. i finally fit a handle, fancied it up and it is nice to look at, but i`ll just do that with it, look at it. the round hole i found easiest, make a handle in about 20 min using  the hawk head as the tool for shaping , and have had no problems with them. use an iron workers spud pin to drift the eyes. makes a nice drop on fit, pick axe style.

 the rectangle eye is still a work in progress, being sized for a readily available handle accessible to all for almost no cost, if any. let me work on that before i get too detailed. i`ve forged the drift and only need to fine tune it. once it warms up.image_zps7c78ddeb.jpg

on the right is the beginnings of the rectangle eye






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