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paradox1559

Using a truck kingpin

8 posts in this topic

 Has anyone ever used a steering king pin out of a semi to make a knife/sword? I recently came about one and am curious to see if it makes a decent blade. It would definitely make a big one.

 Pretty sure it's 4320H

try researching in the knife section, you will find that 20 points of carbon will no harden.

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Don't know about knives but when Jay Sharp was still alive and making tools he used them a lot to make turning hammers and such. Is great steel for toolmaking.

George

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Interesting, I've never used a hammer to make a hammer. Do you know of any pictures of his work?

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Well....

Maybe start out here:

https://search.yahoo.com/search?p=jay+sharp+tools&ei=UTF-8&fr=chrf-yff17

When I first came around the man was already a legend. His tools were always highly sought after and always brought premium prices. You might find stuff of his on ebay but it will always be expensive especially since he's gone now.

I read an article in an old American Farriers Journal back in the early '80s written about him where he said he was making his turning hammers out of Kenworth truck kingpins. The guy was definitely a helluva hand.

George

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based on what little I could find, the man was an artist. The world is probably poorer for his loss.

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About 25 years ago, I replaced the Kingpins in my old Ford Backhoe, and used the old ones to make punches and Hardy tools.

They're still going strong .....

 

I didn't know, ... or care, ... what they were made of, ... and still don't.  :P

 

 

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Just wondering if anyone has had any luck with these just got a few as well and wondering if anyone has any experience with them. Also how to heat treat as I've heard they tend to chip bad. 

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If you have a few experiment with one of them. Cut one into identical pieces, and try some different heats and quenching, then compare the results.

Try contacting a manufacturer (Kenworth, Peterbilt, Freightliner, aftermarkets) of them, and ask what they use? Many times I have had them contact me back which reduces the guessing.

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