Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

My anvil split in half


  • Please log in to reply
33 replies to this topic

#1 Medieval garage

Medieval garage

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Locationillinois

Posted 29 June 2013 - 02:18 AM

My anvil split in half a while ago, and i have this xxxxxx -15 pould jewelers anvil, but it's a piece of xxxx, its really small, has no ledge, and it bounces around when i work. im looking for an anvil that i can get cheap or for free, because the anvil that i have wont isnt compatable with what i do, and im 13 years old and broke.

I have a few options, i could try and get an anvil from the people who read this, or i could try and make one out of a piece of stock that i have, its part of an old rail road, and its rediculously rusted, about 2 feet long, and if you look at it from the side, its in the shape of an L , each its about 1.5 inches thick, and the split parts of the L are both about 5 inches long. If i cut it right, could i manage to fold, and flatten it with my forge and a sottering torch?

I'd really appreciate it if someone cold help me out, cause all my projects are being slowed down by my xxxx anvil.

I apologize for any typos i made, remember, im 13, on summer breake, and typed this on an ipod,. Even if you cant help, thank you for reading this, i know its kind of run-on. Good day, good luck, and god speed. Thank you

 

To start with:  watch your language or your will be banned from the site, read the rules before you post again, if you do not understand them, ask some one, because you are on thin ice



#2 GRiley904

GRiley904

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 130 posts
  • LocationJacksonville, Florida

Posted 29 June 2013 - 02:31 AM

Howdy and welcome to the site. There is allot of great reading here, I would suggest doing allot of that. An anvil doesn't have to look like an anvil to do fine work on. I'm new to smithing myself so i can identify with you, however i use a piece of rail road track as an anvil and it suits me fine for now. I can learn how to forge without damaging a good by the books anvil. Read through the anvils section of the forum and you should be able to get a very good start with very little. After all this craft was birthed with rocks as hammer and anvil.

 

Riley



#3 toolish

toolish

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 143 posts
  • LocationGosford, NSW Australia

Posted 29 June 2013 - 02:36 AM

Mate at your age I would really be looking to find another smith who is near by to try and learn from as (speaking from experience) teaching your self with limited resources and tools is very demolishing and you will most likely just pack it in.

As for an anvil, Go down to your local scrap yard (bring a family member) and see if you can find a lump of random solid metal to use as an anvil, even a sledge hammer head will be ok for starting with.

The scrappy will be the best and at your age they most likely wont charge you  or at least not much, also give you a starting point to obtain materials for forging later on.

Good luck hunting


"I'm off to the shed"


#4 GRiley904

GRiley904

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 130 posts
  • LocationJacksonville, Florida

Posted 29 June 2013 - 02:38 AM

follow up on that. How in the world did your anvil split in half? and at 13 amazing.



#5 Medieval garage

Medieval garage

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Locationillinois

Posted 29 June 2013 - 02:42 AM

Basically, my anvil was attached to a vice grip, in fact it was mostly a vice grip, but then the vice broke, so i unbolted it from my work bench, and it worked grate, then after about 3 years of working like a charm, it just cracked from over use



#6 Dan C

Dan C

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 760 posts
  • LocationCentral Texas

Posted 29 June 2013 - 07:19 AM

At your age time is on your side and you've got determination.  Join the local ABANA group, get a suitable chunk of steel for an anvil.  RR track mounted vertically works well and is how I got started, then earned enough selling what I made to buy a decent used anvil.  Here's a thread that has pictures of what I did w/ mine.

 

http://www.iforgeiro...rr-track-anvil/



#7 Medieval garage

Medieval garage

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Locationillinois

Posted 29 June 2013 - 07:48 AM

Thanks, hadnt thaught of using it vertically that helps alot. Ill let you inow how it goes

#8 ThomasPowers

ThomasPowers

    Senior Moment Member; Master Curmudgeon

  • Members
  • 17,189 posts
  • LocationCentral NM/El Paso TX Area, USA

Posted 29 June 2013 - 08:56 AM

WHAT are you trying to do?  Medieval armouring doesn't require much in the way of an anvil; tool making does.

 

Next:  for about 2000 years and anvil has looked like a hunk of metal; for about 200 the London Pattern has been around---so what does an anvil look like: something used around the world for 2000 years or something with a limited location for 200?

 

Go to your local public library and ILL "The Complete Modern Blacksmith" by Weygers  (and if you wan to see how medieval smiths did it get "Cathedral Forge and Waterwheel", Gies & Gies too)

 

You are probably near some smiths---go to a meeting or two of the local ABANA chapter; some may teach for free or even loan basic equipment


Thomas Psychotic Psychobabblonian Powers

#9 Medieval garage

Medieval garage

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Locationillinois

Posted 29 June 2013 - 09:12 AM

cill out, i appreciate the response, but you dont have to critisize what im trying to do like im experimenting on chidren. with all due respect ill decide what an anvil looks like in my shop. and by the way, medieval garage is a user name, and ya i do make armor too but if you have a bitter oppinion, be like a normal restrained civiliced person and keep it to your self. or atleast dont put your self on a pedastol as if im scrub. understand?

 

Knock it off, or you are gone. There is no reason to act like that. Last warning.



#10 Moderator51

Moderator51

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 48 posts

Posted 29 June 2013 - 09:32 AM

The post that you took offense to offered you good advice. Advice that he has given to many folks in the past that moved forward in metal work as a result.

Your response stepped over the line. I do not see anywhere in his post that he acted unrestrained or uncivil. Nor do I see him being disrespectful to you in any manner.

This site has a lot to offer you but will not allow any member to abuse or be abused by another.

Post any questions you have and use the answers to help you along.



#11 Medieval garage

Medieval garage

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Locationillinois

Posted 29 June 2013 - 09:43 AM

ok your right, im sorry for the way i acted and i will do my best not to do it again. i felt, offended bt\y the "WHAT" part of it, and i saw it as you telling me bluntly that i was wrong. will you accept my apology?



#12 Rich Hale

Rich Hale

    Apprentice curmudgeon

  • Members
  • 3,195 posts

Posted 29 June 2013 - 10:44 AM

Keep in mind that almost any smithing or other hobby takes investments of time and or money to set up. If you would look into the knife making lessons on this site there are pics of a chunk of scrap steel being used as an anvil. May give you more ideas.

And i think I paid less for my first anvil that the price of an I pod!



#13 Hyper Iron

Hyper Iron

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 107 posts
  • LocationNorman, Ok

Posted 29 June 2013 - 11:11 AM

Woah slow down there medieval. These guys have a bottomless well of knowledge they openly share. Telling us many times, steps they wish they had taken when they first started. I like your drive, but you have to be willing to slow down and read and learn all you can about smithing as well as hitting hot metal. Good luck and keep practicing.

#14 Medieval garage

Medieval garage

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Locationillinois

Posted 29 June 2013 - 12:11 PM

Its a shame that i cant aford a 6-pack of mountain dew let alone an ipod

#15 Glenn

Glenn

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 8,757 posts

Posted 29 June 2013 - 01:58 PM

You can use many hand held devices, or even go to the school or public library and use their computers at no cost.  IForgeIron is a wonderful resource for blacksmithing and metalworking. All FREE. 

 

What do you need to get started in Blacksmithing? is a good place to start. You will never have enough money to buy all the toys, but you can get the tools you need.  


If someone questions your standards, they are not high enough.

Do not build a box, that way you do not have to think outside the box.


#16 LastRonin

LastRonin

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 564 posts
  • LocationAlabama on the Gulf coast

Posted 29 June 2013 - 02:35 PM

What do you need to get started in Blacksmithing? is a good place to start. You will never have enough money to buy all the toys, but you can get the tools you need.  

 And once you get a few of the basics and some practice, you can learn how to make the rest. That's the stage I'm in... learning to make the tools.


"You cannot dream yourself into a character; you must hammer and forge yourself one."-Henry David Thoreau


#17 Medieval garage

Medieval garage

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Locationillinois

Posted 29 June 2013 - 04:39 PM

Thaks all for the ideas, ill be sure to check them all out. Its amaIng what talking to your supiriors can do.

#18 ThomasPowers

ThomasPowers

    Senior Moment Member; Master Curmudgeon

  • Members
  • 17,189 posts
  • LocationCentral NM/El Paso TX Area, USA

Posted 29 June 2013 - 06:13 PM

Mr Garage has tendered me a full apology for a post made at a bad time.  Shoot I make those too---especially when my blood sugar is crashing.

 

The What was to indicate that we didn't have enough information to make specific suggestions.  It's a common issue with questions on the internet---the writer knows *exactly* what they are talking about; the readers may be scratching their heads over it.  At least I didn't tell you to take off your aluminum foil hat and think harder so we could try to read your mind---which if I recall was an answer I posted once when *I* was having a bad day...

 

The other thing we commonly get is someone asking a very specific question without giving the general context where often the *real* answer is not within what they are asking.  "Can I use a Maserati as an anvil?"  Yes it will make a poor one though compared to that chunk of dozer that costs many hundreds of thousands less...

 

"The Complete Modern Blacksmith" is all about building your smithing equipment from the ground up and on the cheap; well worth doing an ILL on it  (and nothing impresses parents more than a son asking to visit the library during the summer break!!!!!!!!  Ask at the desk how to do an ILL Inter Library Loan if they don't have a copy themselves.)


Thomas Psychotic Psychobabblonian Powers

#19 BobL

BobL

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 93 posts
  • LocationPerth, Australia

Posted 29 June 2013 - 06:50 PM

The other thing we commonly get is someone asking a very specific question without giving the general context where often the *real* answer is not within what they are asking.  "Can I use a Maserati as an anvil?"  Yes it will make a poor one though compared to that chunk of dozer that costs many hundreds of thousands less... 

I agree, If there is one thing schools and parents could teach, value, and place and increased emphasis on, it's how to ask the right questions. Far too much time is spent on chasing answers to trivial questions that requires little mental processing and can be looked up in a book or on the net. Asking a meaningful question is often harder than finding an answer. When I was a college instructor I occasionally used to set components of assignments where the student had to construct a problem that had context, depth and a non-trivial answer that they could solve. The students hated these because they had to spend a lot of time thinking and answering them. I got this idea from one of my old college professor who said "success in life is not about finding the right answers but asking the right questions"



#20 ThomasPowers

ThomasPowers

    Senior Moment Member; Master Curmudgeon

  • Members
  • 17,189 posts
  • LocationCentral NM/El Paso TX Area, USA

Posted 29 June 2013 - 10:02 PM

Yes the "question behind the question"  in my Maserati example the real question was "I need an anvil, what can I use for an improvised anvil?"

 

And then there are the questions where the answer depends on the experience, skills and equipment of the asker---who often provides *none* of that!  "Can you do patternwelding in a hole in the ground forge using charcoal as fuel and  a claw hammer and a rock as tools?"   Yes I can; probably you cannot!.  Or my favorite: questions that have a location aspect but no location given:  "Where can I buy steel"  to which I could answer 2 miles that away  which indeed is where I buy my steel...

 

There is a saying "The Devil is in the Details!"


Thomas Psychotic Psychobabblonian Powers




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users