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Size of an anvil stand


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#1 bbqhoncho

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 09:03 PM

Is there a rule of thumb on the size of anvil = size of stand.

And I'm not thinkin height, I understand that one.

I know for safety the stand can't be to small.

But I'm also thinkin that they can be to big for like gettin around it and foot room.

I need to build some new ones for anvils I've pickuped

 

  Thank You for all your help, you folks are great



#2 Judson Yaggy

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 09:53 PM

For optimum efficiency the heavier the better without it getting in the way of your feet when you get up close and personal with your anvil.  If mounted firmly the mass of the base helps the mass of the anvil.  If you have to take your anvil in and out of storage then it's ok to lighten up your stand, but for the most bang for your buck an anvil should not move no matter where you hit it, now matter how hard, or no matter the size of hammer.  The base keeps the anvil from moving.  



#3 VaughnT

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 10:53 PM

It really is a balancing act entirely dependent upon your particular circumstances.  

 

Ideally, I prefer a tripod stand that allows my feet to get under the anvil similar to a toe-kick on a kitchen cabinet.  However, I do have another stand that's made out of 6x6 pressure-treated lumber because that's what I had on hand.  The wood is very light compared to the metal stand for my other anvil.

 

The difference, though, is that I like my smaller anvil to have a light-ish base so it's easier to move around.  My big anvil doesn't get moved much, so a heavy stand is okay.

 

One  thing that I saw after building my wood stand was to rotate the anvil on the wood base by 45 degrees so that the long axis of the anvil is bisecting the stump on the diamond instead of the traditional method of running parallel to the side.  Having the corner of the stump sticking between your feet allows you to get a few inches closer because nobody works with their feet tight to one another.  This basically allows for a wider base that's more stable but doesn't force you farther away from the anvil.


When reason fails.....

#4 C.D. Mitchell

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:20 AM

I'm in the process of building several anvil stands out of concrete.  Each base will be 12x15 inches and the height will vary depending on the anvil.  I made a simple wooden from and will pour them with QuickCrete crack resistant cement.  Each stand will be between 250-300 pounds depending on the height.  It's true that the heavier your stand is and the more solidly your anvil is attached to it, the less your anvil will move, which means you get work done more efficiently.  By making the stands out of concrete and bolting the anvils to them, the combined weight will be well over 500 pounds, which would be pretty immobile under most circumstances.  Another reason I chose concrete is that it is much cheaper per pound than steel is, even at scrap prices.

 

I just finished making the form and will hopefull pour the concrete soon.  I'll let you know how they turn out and how it works once the anvils are mounted to them.

 

Here's a link that gave me some good ideas for my build:

http://www.iforgeiro...t-anvil-stands/



#5 Revtor

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 11:46 AM

Wolverine before you pour, you could make grooves for nuts or add some sort of brackets to your forms to help with clamping the anvil down to the concrete bases.  Maybe big eye bolts sticking out from the sides, lots of ways you could do it.

 

post pics when you get em done!

~Steve



#6 ThomasPowers

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 11:48 AM

OTOH The heavier your anvil the less it *needs* the stand to be an important part of the system. So a large anvil might do OK on a smaller stand. My 515# anvil is currently securely mounted on a stump that is smaller than it's base, Note the use of "securely". It's final set up will be on a timber baulk sunk 4' into the ground and just about the size of it's foot print.---won't fall over! Easy to get up to.
Thomas Psychotic Psychobabblonian Powers

#7 C.D. Mitchell

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 04:23 PM

Revtor those are some good ideas.  In fact I've already got some things in mind for that.  I was planning on using Simpson strong-tie concrete anchors to clamp down my anvils and attach tool racks.  The nice thing about using an anchor like that is that I won't have to worry about casting anchors, all thread, or nuts into the concrete during the pour...I can just pour the stand, then drill and add the anchors wherever I need to after it's all dried.  Not only will they hold plenty strong, it'll have a simple and clean look to it, which is something I strive for in my fabrication.  I'll do my best to post pictures...computer technology is not my strong suit.



#8 Alec.S

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 05:51 PM

http://www.iforgeiro...nd +that +works


Pine tar is good. 

 

www.medler-steele.com


#9 bbqhoncho

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 10:43 PM

Thanks for all you input. I'll work on mine soon






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