Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Modified Petersen type H


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Lenaghan

Lenaghan

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 39 posts
  • LocationManitoba, Canada

Posted 04 September 2012 - 11:57 PM

Hi guys, here's a sword I just finished up. Been working on this one for some time now so I'm glad I can get back to the forge again...

blades a 3 bar interrupted twist, with a edge around 220 layers
hilts wrought iron heavly etched with a wood/hempcord/leather handle

Attached File  DSCN2395_01.JPG   349.76KB   350 downloadsAttached File  DSCN2383_01_01.JPG   370.84KB   408 downloadsAttached File  DSCN2406_01.JPG   283.85KB   359 downloadsAttached File  DSCN2354_01.JPG   288.15KB   243 downloads

Hope you guys enjoy... took me all summer to make :blink:

#2 Daniel.85

Daniel.85

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 544 posts
  • LocationMO

Posted 05 September 2012 - 12:37 AM

I love everything about that sword, the pattern, the colors and texture of the hilt/handle. perfect!

#3 ThomasPowers

ThomasPowers

    Senior Moment Member; Master Curmudgeon

  • Members
  • 17,634 posts
  • LocationCentral NM/El Paso TX Area, USA

Posted 05 September 2012 - 10:05 AM

Beautiful work; but the heavily etched wrought iron is definitely a modern look for a blade that "upscale". Swords like that were owned by top of the heap sort of folks and looked it in the fittings. Sort of like having a rusted body put on your Maserati...
Thomas Psychotic Psychobabblonian Powers

#4 Akad

Akad

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 05 September 2012 - 03:22 PM

I too absolutely love the hilt!
"The heart of Turisas was forged by four winds In a smithy high up in the skies
On an anvil honour, with a hammer of blood The Four Winds pounded!"
-Turisas, "Battle Metal"

#5 Lenaghan

Lenaghan

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 39 posts
  • LocationManitoba, Canada

Posted 05 September 2012 - 05:04 PM

Thanks guys,

Thomas I know the hilt should be fancy, it was just my own take on things... if I could get my hands on a bunch of gold or silver I'd love to make a fancy inlay plating job!

#6 ThomasPowers

ThomasPowers

    Senior Moment Member; Master Curmudgeon

  • Members
  • 17,634 posts
  • LocationCentral NM/El Paso TX Area, USA

Posted 05 September 2012 - 05:15 PM

Copper and Nickel Silver? I think it looks great; but it also looks like you did your research and tried hard to get it "right" for a weapon of that time and place which is why I was wondering about the etched WI fittings.

Saw one recently with a polished WI they had inlaid with silver wire that looked pretty good and would not take that much silver! Saw it over at SFI

http://i257.photobuc...rn/P8240818.jpg
Thomas Psychotic Psychobabblonian Powers

#7 Bentiron1946

Bentiron1946

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 3,851 posts

Posted 06 September 2012 - 04:15 PM

Very nice looking! I really like the look of the wrought iron fittings, that's my kind of thing that texture and pattern. The blade is very nice too but that wrought iron is a knock out for sure.

#8 ThomasPowers

ThomasPowers

    Senior Moment Member; Master Curmudgeon

  • Members
  • 17,634 posts
  • LocationCentral NM/El Paso TX Area, USA

Posted 06 September 2012 - 04:26 PM

The problem is that I agree it's smashing with the etched WI. I just know it's historically wrong and would get tired of saying "yes it's just like the ones they used back then except for the pommel and guard" and would expect people to start thinking that they did them that way no matter how many times I told them, (been in reenactment 34 years this fall and have had this happen *many* times...)
Thomas Psychotic Psychobabblonian Powers

#9 Lenaghan

Lenaghan

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 39 posts
  • LocationManitoba, Canada

Posted 06 September 2012 - 06:38 PM

I can see where your coming from, and agree with you Thomas... I should have posted that this was my own take on things. When I was making the sword I never had planned on finishing the sword historically correct, I had wanted to use alot of textures and picked my materials to highlight that. I guess back in the day very few objects one might have would have any shine to them at all, making something that did alot more rare and valuable! Where as today even simple things we have can be reflective... I have nailclippers on my desk that I can see myself in and never thought twice about! And a piece of wrought iron with all it's flaws draws the eye too it...


Mod note: Title edited to reflect this

#10 ThomasPowers

ThomasPowers

    Senior Moment Member; Master Curmudgeon

  • Members
  • 17,634 posts
  • LocationCentral NM/El Paso TX Area, USA

Posted 07 September 2012 - 11:21 AM

I once sent a friend some WI for his knife furniture. He complained it was "too nice" (high grade stuff!) so I cut off a piece of the nastiest wagon tyre I had---he loved that.

Swords were high end "tools"; most fighters used axes and spears---often the Ax may be from the family woodshed for the peasant levies. If you had a sword it meant you were of much higher social scale and so they tended to be "trophy weapons" and look it.

It is possible to shine things up all by hand---I've used sifted wood ashes and a woolen cloth and a bit of spit to get a shine on bone that many people have accused me of buffing it. (Theophilus, Divers Arts, c1120 C.E.) Burnishing of metal is another early method. But you are entirely correct---Bling meant wealth back in those days!

(Still love that blade anyway)
Thomas Psychotic Psychobabblonian Powers

#11 bigfootnampa

bigfootnampa

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 1,956 posts
  • LocationMissouri

Posted 07 September 2012 - 07:26 PM

I think it is really nice!!! BUT how about that leather on the grip? Shouldn't that be brain tanned or "chewed" leather? I mean the chrome or veg tanned is nicer and all but they really didn't have access to that back in "the period"! ;)




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users