Steam Hammers

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My linkage set-up is more of a balancing act between the treadle and the tup than the treadle setting a target and the tup going to that point. As you step on the treadle the motion valve spool begins to move forcing the tup downward. As soon as the tup moves downward the connecting rod (the rod that connects the tup to the linkage) moves the linkage which is connected to the motion valve spool and moves it in the the opposite direction which moves the tup upward. It's this move and counter move thing that lets you bring the tup down slow or fast or hard or soft. John is correct in that I have fixed settings for my incoming air. A low and a high setting. I do adjust the air pressure also. Danger, as far running your hammer with a treadle I would have to believe that you could set your hammer up pretty much the same way as mine although as it has been pointed out before most small steam hammers used the treadle to control the throttle. I can run mine that way but as Grant stated it's not a very good system most of the time.

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Thanks guys, I'm trying to wrap my head around the intricacies of the mechanics. I have watch Grant machine a million times now and am still hypnotized by the control he has over 700 lbs. My goal to set up my hammers with treadle operation as safely and efficiently as possible. I will go ahead and use the small air line to the valve chest with a ball valve for control, this will allow the ram to be up in the stroke when I approach the work. Other than that I will just have to lay out a mechanical link between the treadle and both valves and see what works?

Mud is on the way today!

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our hammers use both treadles and straight levers. how the linkage is ran is pretty complex they use a wiper arm the rides on the ram for timing. depending on when and how hard you press the pedal gives you great control over the hammer if your an experinced operator. you can kinda see the setup from these videos


[media=]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4VTDiNC95M

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That is for sure a nice baby Scury :wub:
You've posted two times the same video :unsure:

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Thanks Scurry, two times is better than none!

Crete is in, wood next week.

I think we may have a new leader in the power hammer test soon :P

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:D I look forward to the results!!!

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Ptree, are those machines still in operation? It would be truly awesome to get some details on the linkages.

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great videos scurry., i am assuming these are closed die machines?
where are you based? and what are the specs. on these hammers?

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Thanks for posting Danger! I can't wait to see the hammers installed! Scurry, those are some big machines, is that an arch hammer? Gives me goosebumps to see a machine that big forging. I too would like some info on where these videos are from and what type equipment your using.
Brian

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Danger Dillon, what is the curing time that you have to wait before loading the machines? That is a mighty deep hole for the big'un.

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It looks like your bases are coming along nice dillon! The base of your hammer is really important. Ive seen some of our bases fail and the hammer will actually start swaying upto a foot at the top, Then its all downhill from there. Right now we have 9 operational hammers ranging from 1,500lbs to 25,000lbs. all of them are erie steams except for our 20,000 its a chambersburg. the two hammers in those video are a 25,000 and the pedal hammer is a 10,000lb. All of our hammers are closed die machines, and our shop is in central IL.

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Thanks for the compliment Scurry, not sure if its right but its the best I can do. Those are some beastly hammers for sure!

John, good question! As thing usually take three times longer than expected, I project a month for the 750 maybe longer. I have to cut and plane all the wood for under the anvil, set both the wood and anvil, form and pour around that as a unit, set the frame then the top then I'll be ready to plum all the lines mmm.... is that all?

Don't know if anybody here knew John Beckwith when he was alive (smithng out of Sloss furnace in Birmingham) but this used to be his hammer. I believe he was the one who put this linkage together on the treadle. I think it would operate much like what Peter describes, moving the ram down as the throttle is opening would give you a one hit operation. I really don't think it will cycle very well though which is what I would prefer. Maybe something similar with a bit more adjustability?

I removed the control valve to drill and tap for the secondary air feed. You can see my handy work from the rebuild showing the control valve machined clean and the inner cage that holds it. I machined the cage from some pipe that was badly pitted but it doesn't seem to affect the performance, probably because of the shear volume of air running through. I'm not sure what happened to the old cage but it was mutilated with huge crevices along the edges of the openings as well the fit on the valve was over a 1/4"!

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John, Clifton Ralph and I ran that hammer at a workshop I taught in 1985 or 86. We forged 3" rounds 3' long to 8' long tapers. Also flattened 3" round alittle and then punched 1.25" holes under the hammer. We had one of us driving the hammer and the other working the iron.

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Great pic Glenn, Clifton has a cigarette hanging out of his mouth as per normal operation... Your back sore after that? I will be raising it off the floor 10" bringing the bottom die up to 35" BTW I graduated high school in 86, never hitting a piece of iron.

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Here you go Glenn:

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Went and picked up the sow block yesterday from Capital machine, they asked me to bid out a forged shaft they needed- 44" forged down to 10" maybe my next hammer...

One down one to go. I built the one for the 200 to be portable, ya know a demo hammer :D

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OOOh! That lot is Awsome, look forward to seeing the final fix!

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Looking good Danger!! How long before your up and running??

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Ken, I would be done soon if you come down here and work some linkage magic B) Back on wood duty after a week of building sand castles and drinking beer :P Shooting for some more mud end of week, might even set the 200 just for a look see.

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Woooooow you have been busy since ive been gone. Im glad your getting the big hammer set! Looks like im missing all the fun.

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Done with the big one, three 12" layers with a 3" cap, after milling flat I got 38" overall.
Over 7' tall with the anvil and sow block. A bit more rebar then I'll be able to set this in and pour it up flush.
Still have to mill the 8 1/2" of wood for under the hammer but I'm getting there.

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Nice carpentry skills but this is a blacksmith forum...jk, thats going to look awesome!

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Looks like I'm a little late with this advice, but do you know the trick of grinding a point onto your threaded rod to help it worm thru slightly mis aligned holes? Hope you got that stuck drill bit back out, or is that some special nut? As a former timber framer, I would recommend a drill guide like this for any one else doing this. http://www.timberwolftools.com/tools/protool/P-GDP.html

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It was the first time I used my router for wood, I had bought it when building a large drive gate in aluminum. Pretty rough in the carpentry department, I just don't like sharp stuff!
No problems with the threaded rod or drill but thanks for the tip and link (that is a coupler nut with a bolt in it, used with a strap to pick up the block). I have quite a bit more wood left from clearing the land to build the shop, been considering using some in my sculptures.
I am curious of your position at Birds Eye, the work is amazing!

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