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Welcome to Welding 101-03


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#1 Robert Yates

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 11:44 AM

Welcome to welding 101-03

Whether you're a do-it-yourself welder who uses shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) only a few times a year or a professional welder who welds every day, one thing is certain: SMAW requires a lot of skill and electrode knowledge. Because variables such as storage techniques, electrode diameter, and flux composition all contribute to SMAW electrode selection and performance, arming yourself with basic knowledge can help you minimize confusion and ensure SMAW success.
  • What are the most common SMAW electrodes?
Hundreds, if not thousands, of SMAW electrodes exist, but the most popular are mild steel electrodes that fall into the American Welding Society (AWS) classification A5.1. These include the 6010, 6011, 6012, 6013, 7014, 7024, and 7018 electrodes.
  • How do I decipher these AWS electrode classifications?
AWS uses a standardized coding system to identify SMAW electrodes. Codes are printed on the side of each SMAW electrode and represent specific properties. For the mild steel electrodes mentioned previously, here is how the AWS system works:

  • The letter E indicates an electrode.
  • The first two digits represent the resulting weld's minimum tensile strength, measured in pounds per square inch (PSI). For example, the number 70 in a E7018 electrode indicates that the electrode will produce a weld bead with a minimum tensile strength of 70,000 PSI.
  • The third digit represents the welding positions for which the electrode can be used. For example, 1 means the electrode can be used in all positions and 2 means it can be used on flat and horizontal.
  • The fourth digit represents the coating type and the type of welding current (AC, DC, or both) that can be used with the electrode.
  • How do 6010, 6011, 6012, and 6013 electrodes differ, and when should each be used?
    The 6010 electrodes can be used only with DC power sources. They deliver deep penetration and have the ability to dig through rust, oil, paint, and dirt. Many experienced pipe welders use these all-position electrodes for root welding passes that are located within a pipe. However, 6010 electrodes have an extremely tight arc, which can make them difficult for amateur welders to use.
    The 6011 electrodes also can be used for all-position welding, except they require an AC welding power source. Like 6010 electrodes, 6011 electrodes produce a deep, penetrating arc that cuts through corroded or unclean metals. Many welders choose 6011 electrodes for maintenance and repair work when a DC power source is unavailable.

    The 6012 electrodes work well in applications that require gap bridging between two joints. Many professional welders also choose 6012 electrodes for high-speed, high-current fillet welds in the horizontal position. These electrodes tend to produce a shallower penetration profile and dense slag that requires additional post welding cleaning.

    The 6013 electrodes produce a soft arc with minimal spatter, offer moderate penetration, and have a easily removable slag. They should be used only to weld clean, new sheet metal.



    6010 and 6011 Electrodes

    The "60" in 6010 means 60,000 pounds' tensile strength (the ability to resist being pulled apart) per square inch. The "1" means it can be run in any position—flat, horizontal, vertical, or overhead.

    The last number, 0 or 1, is some kind of technical jargon that I have never used in my 25 years as a journeyman or instructor. But for you engineer types, you know it has to do with flux composition, slag type, and power supply.

    Both 6010 and 6011 are good electrodes. In my opinion, they are the only rods to tack with. They strike very easily and leave little slag to chip off. They also are very good when you need full penetration. They are a prime choice for welding decking, an application in which you must penetrate through the gauge metal into the joist or beam.
    Crank up the machine to warp 10, and you have a portable torch. It doesn't cut that pretty, but it gets the job done in a pinch when you don't have access to an oxyacetylene rig and need to cut something in a hurry. Make sure the area around you is clear, especially below if you are working up high. Cutting with these electrodes produces big-time sparks and large globs of molten metal.

    6011 runs on AC and direct current electrode positive (DCEP), while 6010 runs only on DCEP. This gives 6011 an advantage if you have an AC-only machine. I have found, and think most welders will agree, that 6010 runs more smoothly. The slag chips off better than 6011, and this is one reason it is used more often than 6011 in root passes on pipes.

    Another advantage of these electrodes is the speed at which they burn. This makes them ideal for welding joists and bridging, especially the stiffening angle going from joist to joist for bracing. These two electrodes have enough strength to do the job and are much faster than 7018. They run great downhill passes where not a lot of penetration or structural strength is required.
  • How do 7014, 7018, and 7024 electrodes differ, and when should each be used?
The 7014 electrodes produce about the same joint penetration as 6012 electrodes and are designed for use on carbon and low-alloy steels. 7014 electrodes contain a higher amount of iron powder, which increases deposition rate. They also can be used at higher amperages than 6012 electrodes.


The 7018 electrodes are easy to use and contain a thick flux with high powder content. They produce a smooth, quiet arc with minimal spatter and medium arc penetration. Many welders use 7018 electrodes to weld thick metals such as structural steel. They also produce strong welds with high impact properties (even in cold weather) and can be used on carbon steel, high-carbon, low-alloy, high-strength steel base metals.

The 7024 electrodes contain a high amount of iron powder content that helps increase deposition rates and are often used for high-speed horizontal or flat fillet welds. These electrodes perform well on steel plate that is at least 1/4 inch thick. They also can be used on metals thicker than 1/2 in.


7018 Electrodes

The 7018 is the backbone of structural welding. This rod runs completely different from the 6010 and 6011 rods—it is much smoother and easier. More of a "drag" rod, the 7018 is also referred to as a low-hydrogen, or "low-high," rod in the field. The flux contains almost no hydrogen, and the rod produces smooth, strong welds that are very ductile.
For this reason, these rods are used extensively in structural welding. I've used them on shopping centers, factories, powerhouses, nuclear weapons assembly plants, high-rise office towers, dams, and bridges. I've also used them on about a billion "neighbor-friend" projects.

The key word for the 7018 is versatility.

A 7018 rod literally should be dragged across the metal when welding. Along with dragging, a welder can weave it back and forth or oscillate it to feather it in on both sides. In vertical welding, some welders will count repetitions on each side of the weld pool, but this is a really bad habit to get into. As my old instructor used to scream into my ear, "Relax your hand and watch the puddle!" As long as you watch the puddle and relax your hand, you should be able to see and feel it tie into the steel. Counting doesn't guarantee a good tie-in; seeing and feeling do.

Shops, field welders, and home hobbyists often do not store 7018 rods properly. Being a low-hydrogen rod, 7018 requires an environment in which no moisture is allowed to get into the flux.

This is achieved by using a rod oven. I have seen all sorts of ovens used. I once saw a refrigerator that was converted into a makeshift oven by placing a high-wattage light bulb inside. This is done all too often and is in no way acceptable—7018 rods should be kept at 250 degrees F. If they are out in the open for less than four hours, they can be rebaked at 700 to 800 degrees F for an hour.

It all depends on the code (for instance, AWS D1.1 92 Steel Structural Welding Code) and what you are welding. I've seen only a few jobs in which the rods were stored correctly, if at all.

Another common mistake is opening the wrong end of the box. Another is throwing the boxes around during storage. Both break the flux off the rods. These damaged rods usually end up being wasted. If the flux is broken only off the tip, they can be long-arced and used. But if the flux is broken in other areas, the rod is useless. It's bad enough tossing away rods only halfway burned, but it is worse to throw away rods that have never been used at all.


If you were to ask a Ford fan, Chevy fan, or Dodge fan which truck is the best, you'd be there for hours. All three are good trucks with different pros and cons.


The same can be said of the different brands of rod. When it comes down to it, almost all are good. Some seem to run more smoothly; like most welders, I do have a preference, but can make do with any of them.


The 6010 and 6011 rods intimidate many first-time welders. Because they require more manipulation, they are a bit harder to run than 7018.


Many instructors teach only the "whip method," while others believe only in "circles" for rod manipulation. I don't care if you stand on your head gargling peanut butter, as long as your weld is sound.

  • What is the best way to choose a SMAW electrode?
Select an electrode that matches the base metal strength properties and composition. For example, when working on mild steel, generally any E60 or E70 electrode will work.

Next, match the electrode type to your welding position and consider your available power source. Remember, certain electrodes can be used only with DC or AC, while others can be used with either.

Assess the joint design and fit-up that you need and select an electrode that will provide the best penetration characteristics (digging, medium, or light). If you're working on a joint with tight fit-up or one that is not beveled, E6010 or E6011 will provide digging arcs to ensure sufficient penetration. For thin materials or joints with wide root openings, select an electrode with a light or soft arc, such as an E6013.

To avoid weld cracking on thick, heavy material or complicated joint designs, select an electrode with maximum ductility. Also consider the service condition the component will encounter and the specifications it must meet. Will it be used in a low-temperature, high-temperature, or shock-loading environment? For these applications, a low-hydrogen E7018 electrode works well.

You should also consider the production efficiency. When working in the flat position, electrodes with a high-iron powder content, as such E7014 or E7024, offer higher deposition rates. For critical applications, always check the welding specification and procedures for the electrode type.

  • What function does the flux surrounding a SMAW electrode serve?
All SMAW electrodes comprise a wire surrounded by a coating called flux, which serves several important purposes. It is actually the flux, or the covering, on the electrode that dictates where and how an electrode can be used.

When you strike an arc, the flux burns and produces a series of complex chemical reactions. As the flux ingredients burn in the welding arc, they release shielding gas to protect the molten weld pool from atmospheric impurities. When the weld pool cools, the flux forms slag to protect the weld metal from oxidation and prevent porosity in the weld bead.

Flux also contains ionizing elements that make the arc more stable (especially when welding with an AC power source), along with alloys that give the weld its ductility and tensile strength. Some electrodes use flux with a higher concentration of iron powder to help increase deposition rates, while others contain added deoxidizers that act as cleaning agents and have the ability to penetrate corroded or dirty work pieces or mill scale.


  • When is a high-deposition SMAW electrode appropriate?
High-deposition electrodes can help complete a job faster, but they are not without limitations. The additional iron powder in these electrodes makes the weld pool much more fluid, meaning that they can't be used for out-of-position welding.

They also cannot be used for critical or code-required applications, such as pressure vessel or boiler fabrication, where weld beads are subject to high stresses.

High-deposition electrodes, however, are an excellent choice for noncritical applications such as welding a simple liquid storage tank or two pieces of nonstructural metal.


  • What is the proper way to store and re-dry SMAW electrodes?
A heated, low-humidity environment is the best storage place for SMAW electrodes. For example, many mild steel, low-hydrogen 7018 electrodes need to be stored at a temperature between 250 and 300 degrees.

Generally, electrodes' reconditioning temperatures are higher than the storage temperature to help eliminate excess moisture. The reconditioning environment for low-hydrogen 7018 electrodes should be from 500 to 800 degrees F for one to two hours.

Some electrodes, like 6011, only need to be stored dry at room temperature, which is defined as a humidity level not exceeding 70 percent and a temperature between 40 and 120 degrees F.

For specific storage and reconditioning times and temperatures, always refer to the manufacturer's recommendations.


Assess Your Base Metal

The first step in choosing an electrode is to determine your base metal composition. Your goal is to match (or closely match) the electrode composition to the base metal type, which will help ensure a strong weld. If you’re in doubt about the composition of your base metal, ask yourself these questions:
  • What does the metal look like?
If you’re working with a broken part or component, check for a coarse and grainy internal surface, which usually means the base material is a cast metal.
  • Is the metal magnetic?
If the base metal is magnetic, chances are good that the base metal is carbon steel or alloy steel. If the base metal is not magnetic, the material could be manganese steel, 300 series austenitic stainless steel or a non-ferrous alloy such as aluminum, brass, copper or titanium.
  • What kind of sparks does the metal give off when touched by a grinder?
As a rule of thumb, more flare in the sparks indicates a higher carbon content such as in A-36 grade steel.
  • Does a chisel “bite” into the base metal or bounce off?
A chisel will bite into a softer metal, such as mild steel or aluminum, and bounce off of harder metals, such as high carbon steel, chrome-moly or cast iron.


Tensile Strength

To prevent cracking or other weld discontinuities, match the minimum tensile strength of the electrode to the tensile strength of the base metal. You can identify a stick electrode’s tensile strength by referring to the first two digits of the AWS classification printed on the side of the electrode. For example, the number “60” on an E6011 electrode indicates that the filler metal produces a weld bead with a minimum tensile strength of 60,000 psi and, as a result, would work well with a steel of similar tensile strength.


Welding Current

Some electrodes can be used with only AC or DC power sources while other electrodes are compatible with both. To determine the correct current type for a particular electrode, refer to the fourth digit of the AWS classification, which represents the type of coating and type of compatible welding current.


Specification and Service Conditions

Make sure to assess the conditions that the welded part will encounter throughout its service. If it will be used in high heat or low temperature environments, subjected to repetitive shock loading, a low hydrogen electrode with higher ductility will reduce the chance of weld cracking. Also, be certain to check for welding specifications if you’re working on critical applications such as pressure vessel or boiler fabrication. In most cases, these welding specifications will require you to use specific types of electrodes.


Environmental Job Conditions

To achieve the best results, you should always remove excessive mill scale, rust, moisture, paint and grease. Clean base metals help prevent porosity and increase travel speeds. If cleaning your base metal is not possible, E6010 or E6011 electrodes deliver a deep penetrating arc that has the ability to cut through contaminants.


Conclusion

Consideration of the above factors will help you overcome the challenges of selecting the correct stick electrode for your particular application. However, given the wide range of available electrodes, several solutions may exist for one application. If you need additional assistance with electrode selection, your local welding supply distributor or a company representative of a reputable filler metal manufacturer can serve as an excellent resource.

Sam

Ret, Sgt. Robert D. Yates , 13 & On Forge


#2 bionicarm

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 09:05 AM

This is very helpful. Could you deffine some Jargon though? I looked around and didn't see them deffined

what are the whip method and circles method? Also, could you post a video of the gargling peanutbutter method?

What is uphill and downhill? If the material is not horizontal and you start at the higher end of the weld that is welding "downhill" and "uphill" is just the opposite? Is it more complex than that?

Is "out of position" welding when the 2 pieces aren't butting right up next to eachother so there's a gap to fill?

Is there an economical way to store rods correctly? Dry and above 250 degrees gets expensive fast! (maybe not in an industrial setting but personally that's a lot of energy, and energy costs money)

Sorry if these are rookie/foolish questions. Thanks for the post, it's very informative for me
people who are sensible all the time are so booring they can nearly put you to sleep.

#3 Aljeter

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 06:33 PM

Howdy, I'm not as experienced as Sam is, but I have welded for a living for a few years. I will answer what questions I can from the above post.

 

what are the whip method and circles method? This one is kind of hard for me to explain through typing, but I will try anyway.

 

 The whip method is where you move the electrode in a motion away from the weld and bring it back to a position just overlapping the area you sere just welding continuing down the path to be welded. I hope this helps more than it confuses.

 

The circle method is when you move the electrode in a circle instead of "whipping" it. 

 

Here is a video of someone using both the whip and circle methods 

 

What is uphill and downhill? The answer above is correct.

 

Usually, out-of-position welding would be considered overhead welding. Some people also claim that it can include vertical welding. However, any position that is not straightforward could be considered out-of-position as well like if you had to twist around a pipe to do a weld, needed to use a mirror, had to bend the rod, etc...

 

I hope this helps.



#4 Frosty

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 07:41 PM

Very nicely done Sam. Are you an instructor? You sure sound like one. I know I haven't heard such a discourse in a long time, too long but I don't weld structural or critical anymore.Thank you for the post, thank you.

 

Whip or circle is rod manipulation to ensure proper puddle and deposition formation. Even (HAH) gmaw (Gas Metal Arc Welding) or mig, (Metal INERT Gas) welding need as much manipulation as necessary to ensure a proper weld. Many if not most wire feed guys think they're point and shoot but they're NOT. You must develop a correct puddle and fill it properly or it's NOT a good weld.

 

When I was learning manipulation was called Weaving. Whip weaving we called "J" stroke weaving, the leg draws the arc away from the puddle along one side of the joint then back curving or holding in the puddle making the curve of the "J" and then away again on the other side of the joint. A whip weave isn't necessarily a "J" pattern, it can be a quick retreat and return, a "V" with a long leg or other similar patterns.

 

A "C" stroke is similar with no retreat leg, just a "C" stroke back and forth in the puddle, advancing as the puddle fills.

 

A circle pattern retreats from the puddle by drawing away, then across to the other side of the joint and back in a circle or oval. Around and around it goes, advancing as the puddle fills.

 

A zig zag pattern is just what it sounds like usually with a little linger in the puddle as the arc is drawn straight across to the far side of the joint, then drawn away at an angle back to the far side and straight back across, repeat, repeat.

 

Drawing the arc away from the puddle allows it to cool in a controlled manner and is important welding out of position. Down hand or overhead the puddle can fall out if you work it too hard. Drawing out and letting it cool a little or form a skim as we called it back when helps keep it from becoming too fluid so it tends to stay where you put it while staying fluid/hot enough to be a contiguous weld.

 

The essence of fusion welding is make a puddle and fill it. Shaping the puddle is determined by what the weld needs. Penetration is determined by many things, 100% isn't always needed or wanted. Say you're but welding 1/4" to 1/2". What should your puddle look like? Even on both sides? not unless you like making holes. The puddle should be a little wider than the base metal is thick or it is scarfed. (Sorry Sam I'm too far out of school to remember the specific numbers) For instance butt welding 1/2" the finished bead should be about 5/8" high and 3/4" wide. Butt welding 1/4" it should be about 5/16 high and 3/8" wide. this is a generalization for mild steel. Welding 1/4" to 1/2" can have a nice even appearing bead but inside it's going to lean to the thicker side so you must weave a deeper puddle on the thicker side and let the thinner bleed in or as we  called it drink in. I have NO idea where "drink in came from" but bleed or drink were acceptable jargon back when.

 

How it looks and feels is the weld talking to you, telling you what's happening if you don't listen you're going to be as successful welding as anyone who doesn't listen to the tools and material at any endeavor.

 

I sure as can be HOPE I haven't muddied the waters in an important subject. Welding is a dear old craft I worked hard to learn and practice to good effect. Passing it on is what us old hands do for the young bucks. I just hope I'm doing so well.

 

Again Thank you Sam. And lastly please correct me as you see fit. I bow to your expertise and training.

 

Frosty The Lucky.


Be yourself. Everybody else is taken.

"unknown"


#5 Robert Yates

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 04:04 PM

Frosty you are correct I was and still do Welding instruction to many young and older folks as a retired Military 44b50 and 45b50 I push All of my students to be able to weld in the most extreme conditions of welding . including but not limited to welding with oil soaked rods ,flux broken rods, out of the normal possessions , (ie the welder up side down ,laying on the side and in confined places , and yes even under water ) my largest weld to date was in the pacific ocean for a refueling station ... it was 6 ft thick slab of steel and 4 sections to build the platform welding with rods that were 1/2 inch round , we sand blasted the welds with a pump that used the sand and water from the ocean floor we could weld for only 6 hrs at a time due to the heat and then had 10 hrs off (rest) and then back to work it took us 9 months to finish the job .

 

Sam    


Ret, Sgt. Robert D. Yates , 13 & On Forge


#6 Robert Yates

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 04:08 PM


 

As a General Rule of thumb the finished weld should be the thickness of 3 rods wide per the rod used (ie and 1/8 rod would produce 3/8 weld , 1/4 rod would 3/4 weld , as per the AWS rules for welding)  your math Bruce is just about spot on .

 

Sam


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#7 Frosty

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 05:31 PM

Frosty you are correct I was and still do Welding instruction to many young and older folks as a retired Military 44b50 and 45b50 I push All of my students to be able to weld in the most extreme conditions of welding . including but not limited to welding with oil soaked rods ,flux broken rods, out of the normal possessions , (ie the welder up side down ,laying on the side and in confined places , and yes even under water ) my largest weld to date was in the pacific ocean for a refueling station ... it was 6 ft thick slab of steel and 4 sections to build the platform welding with rods that were 1/2 inch round , we sand blasted the welds with a pump that used the sand and water from the ocean floor we could weld for only 6 hrs at a time due to the heat and then had 10 hrs off (rest) and then back to work it took us 9 months to finish the job .

 

Sam    

 

Welding heavy plate was my least favorite, I don't like getting roasted alive. Well, okay welding heavy section that requires preheat was/is worse but you're still getting roasted, no foil or butter even.

 

I'm really pleased you've decided to start teaching welding here, it'll be a serious upgrade in all our skills sets. I'd have to say especially those of us who've been welding all our lives, long established bad habits are the hardest to educate out.

 

Frosty The Lucky.


Be yourself. Everybody else is taken.

"unknown"


#8 rm135

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 06:24 PM

I  just registered today and have found this topic(the first I've used) to be great. Thanks Sam.



#9 Robert Yates

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 08:50 PM

Welcome From the Hills of Tennessee.

 

Sam


Ret, Sgt. Robert D. Yates , 13 & On Forge


#10 Rich Hale

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 10:25 AM

Thanks for this Sam I know it is alot of work and I for one will learn alot from it. A question and a thought:

"

What are the most common SMAW electrodes?

Hundreds, if not thousands, of SMAW electrodes exist, but the most popular are mild steel electrodes that fall into the American Welding Society (AWS) classification A5.1. These include the 6010, 6011, 6012, 6013, 7014, 7024, and 7018 electrodes"

Are these really mild steel? The first numbers indicating high tensile strength seems to say they are more?

 

The first time I used 7018 rod I had a hard time restarting the arc..it was horrible. i went to a different welding shop for more rod and the first thing they asked was if I was using ac or dc. There are two different rods in 7018. I got the correct one and it made all the difference in the work. I have never went back to the first supplier.



#11 aessinus

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 02:02 PM

Thanks very much for the post.

 

Just a hint for the occasional welders, a defuct icebox with an incandescent bulb helps keep out ambient moisture.  Your little crackerbox will thank you.



#12 ramdas

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 10:46 PM

wow!! Samcro this is a lot info... you should get some sort of copyright on all of your material before some one plagiarizes it.



#13 Glenn

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 05:48 AM

The entire IForgeIron site is copyrighted. This is in addition to individual copyrights of materials.  


If someone questions your standards, they are not high enough.

Do not build a box, that way you do not have to think outside the box.


#14 Robert Yates

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 09:08 PM

Ramdas this was done for IForgeIron site. And Now belongs to it as an Just teaching others what I know .

 

Sam


Ret, Sgt. Robert D. Yates , 13 & On Forge


#15 Robert Yates

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 06:33 PM

Thanks for this Sam I know it is alot of work and I for one will learn alot from it. A question and a thought:

"

What are the most common SMAW electrodes?

Hundreds, if not thousands, of SMAW electrodes exist, but the most popular are mild steel electrodes that fall into the American Welding Society (AWS) classification A5.1. These include the 6010, 6011, 6012, 6013, 7014, 7024, and 7018 electrodes"

Are these really mild steel? The first numbers indicating high tensile strength seems to say they are more?

 

The first time I used 7018 rod I had a hard time restarting the arc..it was horrible. i went to a different welding shop for more rod and the first thing they asked was if I was using ac or dc. There are two different rods in 7018. I got the correct one and it made all the difference in the work. I have never went back to the first supplier.

 

 

To your Question ,  RICH

 

"the American Welding Society (AWS) classification A5.1. These include the
6010, 6011, 6012, 6013, 7014, 7024, and 7018 electrodes"

Are these really mild steel? The first numbers indicating high tensile strength seems to say they are more? "

 

YES they are Mild Steel Yet they do Have High Tensile strength properties .  they can be worked as a mild Steel until you either Weld with them or add them to a forged product when the rod/rods harden the base steel binds /is welded by the forge heat and the Chemical reaction of the Welding process that melts the rod adds to the metal being worked .

 

When this happens the Melted rod cools off and the properties of the steel change at the weld, the rods become the 2 part of the Numbers on the rod " The High Tensile part of the rod  .

 

So in a short answer Yes they are a Mild Steel , However they have a varying tensile rating as to how much the rod after being welded or forged become a Harden piece of Steel. there is quite a bit  of difference By What rod is used .

 

Sam 


Ret, Sgt. Robert D. Yates , 13 & On Forge


#16 Rich Hale

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 02:15 PM

Sam you certainly have a ton of information and it is wonderful you can share on here for all to learn...In my relativley non welding professional experience mild steel if used as a welding rod would not change after it is welded,,except perhaps it may pick up some of the properties of the base metal if they included more ingredients that would allow that. Only rod that may contain mild and additional additives would  change when used in welding. That to me is why there are different rods availeable.

mild steel.  at least the 1018 variety has a tensil stregth of 68,800. The 70 series welding rods are rated to have 70,000 strength. So there must be something other than mild in the rods.

i am not trying to be difficult just trying to understand this part of wot youi have shared on  here. And again thanks.



#17 jeremy k

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 04:56 PM

Upon talking with a technical rep today at the Miller Welding Co. he told me basically the rods are a mild steel or a slight variation, the differance in the stick welding rods is the addition of the coating mat'ls and upon welding they combine (base metal, rod mat'l and the flux receipe) to form the desired weld needed or required. The coating facilitates the rod position capabilities and the addition of alloys into the flux changes the composition during the welding process to produce the desired "alloyed" result. So in a nut shell he said the alloying is done through the coatings. That's the best I can explain what he told me without having him do a full thesis on it.

#18 Rich Hale

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 05:10 PM

Duh,,I have known for along time that the different coatings make rods do different things,,,,I just never put two and two together and saw the connection in the welds finished strengths,

Thans Jeremy and again Thanks Sam!



#19 Robert Yates

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 07:56 PM

Thank you Jeremy,

 

For answering rich I still have the flu and it is whipping my butt and I am worn out right now .

 

Sam

 

sorry for the long time it took to respond Rich .


Ret, Sgt. Robert D. Yates , 13 & On Forge


#20 frodo

frodo

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 09:11 AM

the whip and pause showed on the you tube is also called "stacking dimes"   if done correctly it looks like a stack of dimes laying on its side

  its a pretty weld.  i know an old grumpy welder that can stack dimes that look like the real thing.   hes good!!  

 i cant stack tires, much less dimes


I dont always shoot

but, when I do, 

I shoot M 1 carbine

stay armed my friends

 

 





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