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Log splitter press


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#1 2703adam

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 08:50 PM

Hi guys,
Well, after spending six and a half hours forging out a san mai 9 inch Chefs knife, I realized I need a forging press. Since money is tight I think I'm going to either build one or make something work. Now comes my question... Sears has an electric hydraulic 7 ton log splitter for around $398. This is much more feasable than $1000 and up, so do you guys think 7 tons would be enough to do some light pattern welding and drawing out and such? If not, why, and what is the minimum tonnage I would need.

Thanks,
Adam

#2 Altusjg

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 02:23 AM

I asked a similar question about a 6ton press a while back after hand forging my first billet of pattern welded steel(1095 & 15N20)and feeling it in my elbow for days. I was told to go with no less than a 20 ton press. I've done a bit of looking around since. You can buy a 20ton air/hydraulic shop press at Harbor Freight for $300 at the link below which would be within your price range.
http://www.harborfre...hydraulic press
Of course you still need an air compressor that will keep up with the demand of the press.
I am looking at buying something similar to this press or at buying a 20ton or better air/hydralic bottle jack and building my own frame. Let me know if you do end up buying this one or something similar as well as how it works if you do. Hope this helps some. Good Luck!!
Altus

#3 Stormcrow

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 12:15 PM

I have one of the Harbor Freight 20 ton air/hydraulic bottle jacks. It's pretty slow, but people have made it work. There are threads on building forging presses with them here. I'd skip out on buying the whole shop press frames, as I have one as well and it is too weak and bent under the strain. Fabricate your own or have a welding shop fab one to your design and it should work better.

I would guess that if you dig through the comments on this video from the MAD Dwarf Workshop you may find what tonnage they're using:


James Helm - Helm Enterprises, Forging Division
www.helmforge.com

#4 Woodskevin

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 10:03 PM

Oh I better order a full rebuild kit for my 27 ton log splitter. I foresee a huge increase in use!!! Thanks for the idea!!!

#5 John Hartzell

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 07:21 AM

If you guys are interested in using an air over 20 ton shop press Pete modified this one to really speed it up and make it more forge friendly. check it out at http://www.spaco.org/Press.htm

#6 Dale Russell

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 05:01 PM

http://www.iforgeiro...__1#entry146537


http://www.iforgeiro...h__1#entry76571
What more could a bloke want,
ta play with fire & hit things.
( Oh & drink BEER )

#7 basher

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 05:21 PM

I would really recommend using a press of the kind you want to build..
I visited quite a few shops before deciding to make mine in the way that I final did . this was invaluable.
I can not emphasise how important speed it if you are working hot metal with a press.
Owen Bush bladesmith
Forging Soul into steel
bushfire forge school of smithing

#8 Jonathan Dracon Michelin

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 08:42 PM

I would like to do what the Mad Dwarf workshop boys did, the hydraulic press, id love to duplicate but i have no idea where to start, any advice?

#9 Daniel.85

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 09:03 PM

I would like to do what the Mad Dwarf workshop boys did, the hydraulic press, id love to duplicate but i have no idea where to start, any advice?


They just had a 27ton log splitter in that video I believe, they may have gotten a bigger one now from what I read. Not much to duplicate, just make a set of dies and weld up some adapters or however you want to do it. You dont want to have to cycle through the entire length of the cylinder each time ether. Here is a log splitter conversion write up https://docs.google....zzH18RGNtMs2M4A



I thought about doing the log splitter but then decided to start buying what I need for this, I should be welding it together this summer if all goes as planned.
http://primalfires.y...79#.T2flgdWBp7I

#10 Jonathan Dracon Michelin

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 09:07 PM

They just had a 27ton log splitter in that video I believe, they may have gotten a bigger one now from what I read. Not much to duplicate, just make a set of dies and weld up some adapters or however you want to do it. You dont want to have to cycle through the entire length of the cylinder each time ether. Here is a log splitter conversion write up https://docs.google....zzH18RGNtMs2M4A



I thought about doing the log splitter but then decided to start buying what I need for this, I should be welding it together this summer if all goes as planned.
http://primalfires.y...79#.T2flgdWBp7I


ok nice, any advice for a newbie?? i want to make a press that easier and faster than hammering, and all i could get was an 11 lbs anvil LOL

#11 Daniel.85

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 10:08 PM

ok nice, any advice for a newbie?? i want to make a press that easier and faster than hammering, and all i could get was an 11 lbs anvil LOL


Spend the next couple weeks reading/googling/surfing forums till you have understand all the terminology and techniques used with those types of presses, you dont need a huge custom one to get started, if you already have a small log splitter to convert, you just wont be able to work very heavy stock as you get smaller.

Start by reading all these;
https://docs.google....;sig=AHIEtbRNvUtd5U5RmttzzH18R

http://knifenetwork....ead.php?t=54637

http://primalfires.y...79#.T2f0aNWBp7I

http://www.dgentile....ging-press.html

http://www.metalarti...-forging-press/

http://www.dfoggkniv...om/hydralic.htm

#12 Jonathan Dracon Michelin

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 10:19 PM

ok thank you Daniel.C.85

#13 Backwoods Blacksmith

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 10:09 AM

I used a 25 ton log splitter that attached to my tractor. I convereted it to an electric driven pump, removed the wedge and fabed up a stout push block that I can change anvils on. I mostly use it for swadging grapes, tennons and texturing. For some things I like it better than the treadle or power hammer.
I can change back to the wedge and still split wood, but since the moter is 220 volt I have to use my generator when in the field. [Don't have the tractor any longer]. I think to be effective, you need at least 20 tons and this means a very stout frame. I like the looks of the one made from heavy I beam using the center web for the upper and lower shelf..




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