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Metal Slag Splinter Removal


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#21 ianinsa

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Posted 07 April 2011 - 01:47 PM

And don't forget your tetanus shot.

Don't be daft, once it's been in the coil it will have quaterised the wound :D
safe as houses like! :)

Hope it heals soon Ted.

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#22 Borntoolate

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Posted 07 April 2011 - 09:31 PM

I think Ted T summed it well. Thanks for the help all!

#23 ThomasPowers

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Posted 08 April 2011 - 10:21 AM

Ian; actually I think that method could result in severe damage to the ear drums so be sure to put on your hearing protectors before trying it!
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#24 Guest_Johnnie_*

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 03:25 AM

I know this topic is an old one but its helped me too!
I have had a splinter in the palm of my hand and the heal of my left foot ( how it got there? God only knows) for what seems like weeks now and have tried everything to get them out.
The littleXXXXXXX must be of a high carbon content to get through my skin esp. my heel and also barbed cause till now they have resisted needles, craft knife, band aids and numerous soakings in hot water.........................
Induction heating coil big enough for my foot mmm after you Grant!!!

#25 David Gaddis

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 09:51 AM

Amputation! Yes that wil solve the problem. And right before you keel over you place my name as beneficiary to all you blacksmithing tools.

That will make it easier on the survivors as they would no longer have to look at that wasted equiptment.

Carry on
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#26 JimsShip

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:50 PM

I'm suprised no one has mentioned Duct Tape yet, it's a standard item in my first aid kit. I use the high grade stuff to get out all sorts of embedded pieces. I use a sterilized needle to open the entry way a bit and rub the tape on and peel off. It usually gets the offending item out, as well as a few hairs you'd never expect to be there!

It's also great for packing bleeds and other wounds during transport to the hospital. (Wrap the wound in a cleanish rag first!)

#27 ThomasPowers

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 12:09 PM

My favorite method for getting splinters out when I have problems with them is: my wife with a magnifier lamp, exacto knife, needle nose tweezers and a really good sense of humour for when I start confessing to the assassination of Lincoln, Garfield and Kennedy, the location of the buried treasure, etc.

Then triple antibiotic ointment and a good band-aid if needed.

I keep a rare earth magnet from an old disk drive in the bathroom cabinet as it's just the thing for getting out steel that hasn't embedded in the eye before it does!
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#28 Private Entrance

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 02:50 PM

I'm suprised no one has mentioned Duct Tape yet, it's a standard item in my first aid kit.

It's also great for packing bleeds and other wounds during transport to the hospital. (Wrap the wound in a cleanish rag first!)

I haven't used duct tape for pulling splinters/slivers, but I can recommend it for an improvised bandage. A wad of paper towel and a wrap or two of duct tape and you're good to go, at least for minor stuff that doesn't require a doctor. Thing I liked most about it was that it was water-proof. I could keep working on the wet belt sanders and not worry about losing my 'band aid'.

#29 War wick

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 03:47 PM

I have another remedy that you could try. Here in Moz if we step on a poisonous thorn or a sea urchin while bare foot. We draw out the splinters using a paw paw (papaya) skin. First we cut the paw paw open. Then we carefully remove the seeds from the centre of the paw paw. Once the seeds are removed we scrape the fleshy fruit away from the outer fruit skin. We then eat the fleshy fruit Once the fruit has been consumed the final step is to place the moist pulpy side of the paw paw skin against your own skin in the area of the splinter.Bandage the paw paw skin in place and then remove the bandage after 24 hours.
Paw paw is amazing at drawing out organic splinters. Maybe paw paw could also work on steel splinters.

#30 Old N Rusty

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 05:25 PM

I can remove steel splinters that are not too deeply in my skin that they cannot be felt on the surface with a very sharp knife dragged so the HAIR EDGE catches the splinter and pulls it out. Drag the blade , don't slice.

#31 rockstar.esq

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 06:44 PM

Back when I was an apprentice I was sent out to a jobsite on Christmas eve with a journeyman who had a doctor's appointment just after lunch. He went in to get a bump on his hand looked at. He came back several hours later in a cast and sling! He told me he must have gotten a metal splinter in that hand several years before. The splinter infected and started something called a "spiral cyst". The doctors scheduled emergency surgery for Christmas morning because they felt center of the cyst was septic enough that he'd get blood poisoning should it rupture. They didn't want him to leave but he wouldn't be dissuaded from collecting his tools before hand.

I'm always impressed at how we're all durable and fragile at the same time!

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#32 Ten Hammers

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 07:45 PM

A small Victorinox (or Wenger) knife with scissors and tweezers/toothpick is an essential thing on my keyring for 25 years anyway. The tweezers are for any splinters from pallet to metal and normally the knife stays sharp enough to drag accross and free the splinter to pick it.
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#33 Hayden H

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 08:19 PM

Hard drive magnets are my go to for odd ball slivers and kerf that get embedded. The little hard drive magnets when stuck to plate steel cannot be removed without breaking the magnet first, work wonders on anything stuck to your skin. Used em to get metal out of my eye a few times
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#34 seldom (dick renker)

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:51 AM

i have used and keep a can on hand all the time of watkins petro-carbo salve. does a real nice job of drawing out splinters. dab some on area and put a bandaid on. should be out the next day or so. have used this stuff since the mid 40s and have never been without it.

#35 macbruce

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 10:13 AM

Another good source of rare earth magnets is from sonic toothbrush heads. I keep one glued onto a 1/4'' brass rod about 3'' long.....It has saved me a couple of times getting steel specs out of my eyes.....If they're stuck real good it's off to the ER...... :(
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#36 ThomasPowers

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 11:27 AM

And just a cautionary note: If you feel that you have something in the eye do go to the Dr in a timely manner! Steel has a nasty tendency to rust and having the rust ring ground off your eyeball can be avoided if they remove the splinter before it gets a chance to rust!
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#37 ianinsa

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 12:47 PM

Thomas, have you forgotten that muratic acid disolves rust in a jiffy :lol:
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#38 ThomasPowers

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 01:37 PM

I assume you are blacksmithing by the Braille method now?
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#39 Alan Evans

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 07:07 AM

I have another remedy that you could try. Here in Moz if we step on a poisonous thorn or a sea urchin while bare foot. We draw out the splinters using a paw paw (papaya) skin. snip


Aha! Now I know why it is called paw paw, getting thorns out of paws! Have to try and grow some in the polytunnel.

A small Victorinox (or Wenger) knife with scissors and tweezers/toothpick is an essential thing on my keyring for 25 years anyway. The tweezers are for any splinters from pallet to metal and normally the knife stays sharp enough to drag accross and free the splinter to pick it.


20 years ago a friend took me into a vast outdoor equipment warehouse near Berkeley in Cal... about 5 acres of camping gear! The reason he took me in and the only thing I came out with was tiny, an "Uncle Bill's Sliver Gripper", I carried it in the car until I lost it last year, absolutely brilliant device. Precise sharp points and a broad hinge/spring which keeps the points aligned. Enabled me to dig out hundreds of mine, my assistants' and family members' splinters!

Happily I managed to locate a source for them here in the UK so I have replaced them. They have improved them with a key ring clip, the only thing that failed (after ten years) was the plastic bottle of the first set! Thoroughly recommended. Best fiver you could spend.

I assume you are blacksmithing by the Braille method now?


Yes, he has got a real feel for it!

#40 Grizzer

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 10:04 AM

A method I find very handy for splinters and cactus spines (especially those near invisible ones) is to put Elmer's glue over the area and let it dry. When I peel it off, the splinter has almost always come out with it.




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