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Saw blades to knife blades??


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#1 Robar

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 01:33 PM

I have heard and read that saw blades are good for making knife blades. I'm fairly confused on what saw blades make good knife blades. While all I have is a pic, but no specific information could someone give a clue? I found these for sale locally and am wondering if they are the right type of blade. Thanks for the help.

RobertAttached File  P1235764.jpg   53.6KB   151 downloads

#2 ThomasPowers

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 02:11 PM

Generally saw blades where the body of the blade itself is used to make the blade section are better than ones where carbide chunks are applied to the "teeth".

Ask at a saw sharpener for blades that they are discarding; probably get them for free!
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#3 Robar

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 02:42 PM

Thank you Thomas

#4 Ecart

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 06:42 PM

I sharpen bandsaw blades for a living and have collected MANY blades like the ones you have pictured. I've made several knives out of them and sold them. I always follow up my sales with a "how's it holding up?" email to my customer. I have never had a single complaint about the durability or edge holding ability of the knife. I've been corrected a time or two on my own execution- which is great btw- but never a complaint about the knife itself. I would gladly use the blades you have for knives.

Just my thoughts and experience.

Eric

Edit: I would agree with Thomas about acquiring the blades though. If you can find a local mill or saw shop, you could most likely have far more saw blades than you can use any time soon. I have paid a grand total of $0 for all of the blades that I have. Most mills end up with old and useless blades sitting around.

#5 Stan C

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 08:39 PM

:unsure: Great info - now that I have plenty of saw blades, how do you cut the profile of the knife - angle grinder with a cutoff wheel??
Thank you for the response.

Stan C

#6 keithl

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 09:01 PM

My first blade was made from a old saw blade. I just sliced a strip out with the angle grinder. Then forged it to shape and draw filed it smooth. It heat treated well and holds a edge very good. Here's a picture. Go for it. Keith.

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#7 Willis

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 06:16 AM

I make a lot of knives from saw blades and use an angle grinder with a cut off blade. Just be careful not to let the metal 'burn' as you cut it. Any area that turns a blue color while your cutting will be a soft spot on the blade.
If you have a friend that has a plasma cutter or own one yourself that works even better.
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#8 Steve Sells

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 09:57 AM

you blue color you refer to is not a problem if you are forging a blade, a real burn is a problem, but blue is just a temper color and wont be a problem after a proper heat treat.
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#9 Ecart

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 08:11 PM

To echo what was already said about using an angle grinder and a cut-off wheel: BE CAREFUL!!!! If you have access to a plasma cutter, please use that instead. But if you are like me, it's the angle grinder and a lot of caution.
@ Steve: I have lots of people ask me, "Don't you ruin the temer when you cut them out?" I tell them, "Oh, by the time it takes a trip into my forge the temper is shot anyway." Most folks I talk to miss the idea that I actually forge the blades instead of grinding them until the question of heat treat and temper comes up.

#10 macbruce

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 10:05 PM

Another good source that is practically unlimited for knife blades and can be had for next to nothing, is lawnmower blades...mb
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#11 evfreek

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 11:53 AM

Do a spark test and a hardening test. I have found that the circular saws with carbide teeth are a chrome low carbon spring steel, which is springy but not great for hardening. The huge ones without brazed carbides spark like the big 15N20 wood bandsaw blades. These are hardenable, and are good for knives. If you can get over to visit a bladesmith in your area, that would help.

#12 mat

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 03:28 PM

check this thread on british blades
http://www.britishbl...r.-.-.-./page15
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