Psi

19 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

At what pressure does everyone run their regulator on a propane forge?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Atmospheric (venturi type) or blown? I run my 2 venturi style forges between 4 and 10 psi depending on what I'm doing. I run a 3 burner NC Tool forge and a 2 burner Chile forge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Ya know thats not really enough question... My Johnson forge will basically take all the propane you can get out of a 25 gal bottle and it not be enough to run all 4 burners With the regulator maxed out (it reads up to 80 psi) it will never get about 15psi because there is no back pressure... big orifices... big burners very inefficient... Now my 12" round forge with a T Rex Hybrid burner Its all about what I want for heat... I'll run it about 20 psi until it gets up to heat... If I am doing general forging I might back it down in to the 5-10 PSI range.... If I am welding I might crank it up to 25 PSI

My two burrner venturi home made forge I run about 15-20 PSI after it is warmed up... It has two 1" burners that have a #60 drill orifice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

5-7 on my chilli usually only use 1 burner...run both to bring up to temp...60# lasts about 40 hrs+/-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

3-10 psi depending. 2 burner atmospheric. Freezes a 20 lb bottle hard in 1.5 hours, in a tank of water makes a 2 inch rim of ice in 2 hours.
Phil

As requested orifice size
Orifice size .035 contact tips. 3/4 inch Frosty T-burner. Build specifics are here.
http://www.iforgeiron.com/forum/f86/i-pumped-frosty-information-made-13160/
Phil

Edited by pkrankow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I run my single burner atmospheric at 3-6 psi for regular forging, 12-15 for welding.

Adam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Yeah but like I said... those pressure numbers are meaningless without a corresponding orifice size.... 5 PSI with running out the end of an open hose is not the same as 5psi running to a forge with a 1/64 th size orifice One has a CF that equates to a fraction of a gallon per hour... The other a CF that is several gallons per hour.... Just the PSI number, unless you are comparing two identical factory made forges.... doesn't tell you anything

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

My Sofa Workshop built aspirated forge I generally run close to 10 psi on the gauge I have on it's regulator. HOWEVER I have not calibrated this gauge in years and so it may be +/- 50% as small cheap gauges are notorious for being in accurate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I ran my single burner atmospheric up to 22 psi and couldn't get weld heat. What am I doing wrong?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I ran my single burner atmospheric up to 22 psi and couldn't get weld heat. What am I doing wrong?


First what burner and orifice size?

Second is it tuned reasonably well? Lean/rich, flame down center of flare...

third how well insulated is your forge?

4th how big is the cavity?

5th how about the openings, how big are those?

Then we get into procedure: What material(s) are you trying to weld? How long did you soak for, was the forge fully heated up?

Oh, and Got pics of your setup?

Phil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I run my home made hybrid burner at about 5 psi for general forging out a .035 tip. When running both burners I up it to around 7#. Haven't forge welded in it yet because I'm to lazy to coat it with ITC-100 first. I use coke forge instead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

For general forging I run my diamondback two burner at about 4-7 psi depending on the steel. Welding I run it from 12-15 psi depending on what Im welding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I'm not home right now, but I'll get that info to you Phil. Thanks for offering to help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

First what burner and orifice size?

Second is it tuned reasonably well? Lean/rich, flame down center of flare...

third how well insulated is your forge?

4th how big is the cavity?

5th how about the openings, how big are those?

Then we get into procedure: What material(s) are you trying to weld? How long did you soak for, was the forge fully heated up?

Oh, and Got pics of your setup?

Phil

It's a commercial unit. Here's a pic. Single burner forge. 3" x 7" x 6-1/2" firebox, With Rear Bar Stock Door with flap cover 3" x 1-1/2" about the same
on the front opening. Looks to be 1" Kaowool lining with a firebrick floor. I don't know the orifice size but it's small. Guessing about #60.

th_P10_0107_1.jpg

I'd be happy with a simple folded weld on 1/2 bar stock. Mild steel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

It's a commercial unit. Here's a pic. Single burner forge. 3" x 7" x 6-1/2" firebox, With Rear Bar Stock Door with flap cover 3" x 1-1/2" about the same
on the front opening. Looks to be 1" Kaowool lining with a firebrick floor. I don't know the orifice size but it's small. Guessing about #60.

th_P10_0107_1.jpg

I'd be happy with a simple folded weld on 1/2 bar stock. Mild steel.


I haven't counted the hours on my single burner, atmospheric, forge yet. It will operate at about 6 psi for normal forging. It won't make weld heat at any pressure. A 30# tank will last me a long time. Not much problem with freeze ups. I guess that's because I usually shut down every few minutes to save gas while I stupidly fumble about my shop. Maybe the 110 f weather helps too. :)


Based on your post in this thread:
http://www.iforgeiron.com/forum/f86/questions-about-propane-use-16171/
the problem may be procedure, but some propane forges can't weld either, they simply are not built to do so as many tasks never require welding. Contacting the mfg would be the next step to find out if this forge was built to weld or not.

With my 2 burner forge, I can forge before it is fully hot on small stuff (1/2 inch or smaller) but for a welding attempt it needs to heat at 7-10 psi for a good 15-30 minutes AND the metal needs to soak for 5-10 minutes, until I can't tell the color of the forge floor from the metal. You should be looking with a tinted welding lens, or at least dark sun glasses. It is uncomfortable (and harmful) to look without tinted eye wear.

If your forge is supposed to be able to weld, then heat the forge till it is thoroughly hot first. This can be done at a forging pressure since you want to warm up on some light forging anyways. Crank the pressure up some after it is hot and glowing, put your steel in to soak and give it a try when everything looks "white" hot.

Put that bottle in a bucket of water, it will freeze during welding, and potentially reduce your pressure. Cold tap water is fine. You will also suck up a lot more gas than for regular forging.

I can only fagot weld so far, but that is not my forges fault. I'm still learning too, and many other people here know a whole lot more than me.

Phil

PS higher carbon steel welds at a slightly lower temperature.

Phil Edited by pkrankow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

i run my nc 2 burner at 4-6psi for modding and shaping keg shoes and 10-15psi for handmades and forge welding barshoes and such. i go thru 2 tanks a week in the mobile rig. everything in the shop is done in the coke.

if im praticing for a contest or heating stacks of all 4 shoes ill crank it up to 20psi. repeitive forging i run it a big higher for faster recovery.

Edited by horseshoer1983

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

PKrankow: Thanks for the suggestions. I fooled around this morning moving the orifice around in the burner tube and it "sounds" better. I didn't try to weld but I forged a dragon head bottle opener for my son, the bartender. From what you've said, maybe my problem is just patience. My wife says I have none. We're about to take off to spend the holidays out of country. I'll try again when I get home. I may have to buy another galvanized tub to put the propane cylinder into with water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I have a blown 1.25" X 10" tube with a about a .05" orifice. Inside a 6" x 15" chamber blanketed with 2" of Ins-wool and coated with AP Green refractory mortar, I run about 3 - 5 psi for general forging. 8 - 12psi for serious work and general welding. Haven't gone much higher for fear of creating a China Syndrome effect but it gets stupid hot where I believe the lining could melt if run at length. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Get a pyro meter and a K thermocoupler. You can Figure out the exact presure and temp your forge should be. I picked one up a month ago and found I had too high of presure for what I needed and was able to turn it down which will save me gas.

Martin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now