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chainsaw bars?


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#1 adamj

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 07:48 PM

does anyone know what type steel chainsaw bars are made out of like the carbon content and stuff?

#2 darksaber

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 08:04 PM

Not 100% sure but I seem to remember reading somewhere that they were high carbon. The article I read said the chains and bars both had to be high carbon to stand up to the rigors of chainsawing. Can't remember where I read it but know I did at one point.

Hopefully someone else will stop in and give a clear concise answer because I was thinking of trying the same thing later.

If you try it for kicks and giggles let me know how it turns out cause it sounds interesting. :P
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#3 outsider

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 11:21 PM

i'm not at all sure either but HC would seem a darn good guess since i really work mine to death and the bar still is in good shape.
would be interesting to see what you do with it since i have a few sitting around the shop here.
ohh hey try calling a chainsaw place or a repair shop they should know

#4 Jocko 58

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 03:54 AM

You could try Carlton chainsaw chain and bars in the US or griffin and berends GB products in OZ. They bars for world wide manufactures
Hope this helps:)

#5 Ecart

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 05:45 AM

It won't tell you exactly what kind of HC, but you could do a spark test.

#6 chuckster2.0

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 11:50 AM

Isn't their a place where you can get that tested? Like a lab or something?

Edited by chuckster2.0, 31 August 2009 - 11:53 AM.


#7 Frosty

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 12:17 PM

They used to be higher C before the roller bar but they're still pretty tough. Last I heard they were an air hardening steel and made decent knives. That was a couple decades ago though, not making knives I don't keep up on these things.

Frosty

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#8 adamj

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 02:25 PM

the main reason is i have a guy thats gonna give me a bucksaw bar thats around 5 to 6 foot long and like 6 inches wide. he wants a sword out of it.

#9 Rob Browne

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 05:47 PM

That is going to be an impressive blade! It will be big enough to cut through rocks and stuff like butter :)

Bet you are looking forward to the "left overs" as there will be plenty.
Rob Browne


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#10 tdi-rick

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Posted 07 September 2009 - 05:01 AM

Hi fella's, was doing a search for something else and found this Q and forum.

Having looked into this, bars can vary a bit in composition.

GB use, or at least used to use Australian Bisalloy Bisplate 500 in their top of the range bars.
It's a through hardened low/mid carbon/silicon/manganese/nickel/moly and relatively high levels of chrome type steel, originally developed for mining applications (gougers, buckets, dump truck liners, etc)
It has a UTS of around 1640mPa

Tsumura from Japan who make excellent bars every bit as good or better than anyone else use Japanese SKS51 tool steel, which has a much higher carbon content than Bisplate 500 (0.75-0.85% vs 0.29% for BP500) and mid levels of silicon/manganese/copper, very high nickel levels and no moly.
It's primarily developed for knives, tools and handsaws.

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Edited by tdi-rick, 07 September 2009 - 05:05 AM.


#11 jevaccaro

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 01:59 PM

I made a hunting knife out of a chain saw bar a friend gave me. As I recall it was an Oregon Bar about 3 feet long. The smaller ones are laminated. This one hardened and tempered like carbon steel and made a very good knife. I dressed and skinned several Elk, Deer, and Antelope with it be for my son lost it. I have made another one but have not used it much yet. I triple heat treated it. Heated it to critical and quenched in Marvel Mystery oil.
John

#12 pkrankow

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 02:19 PM

All my bars are laminated 3 layers, spot welded in a bunch of places. I have 2 14 inch bars, 1 16 inch and 1 12 inch. The 12 and 16 are from the early 80's I think. The 14's are about a year old, one is on the saw from the early 80's, and the other came with the new saw. All saws are Poulan and all bars are Oregon.

I only use the 14 inch and set up both good saws to use the same size/type bar and chain. I had been trying to get 12 inch chain for a climbing saw, but gave up and put a 14 on.

I am thinking on scrapping the 12 and 16 to make something eventually. I wonder if all 3 layers are the same grade of steel.

Phil
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#13 Ironlord Oz

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Posted 10 September 2009 - 11:47 PM

I've always been told chainsaw bars are mostly made from O1 tool steel, very good for making knives out of. The 3 layered bars have 2 different steels & from the spark test the middle one is iron. The outer layers spark the same as other single piece bars. I know it makes an easy way to build up layers for a damascus billet & the contrast when etched is great! Hope this helps:) Wayne

#14 grasshopper

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 10:44 PM

g'day, i made 2 throwing knives about 8 inches long from a laminated bar.they don't bend or brake no matter how much i abuse them. i cut them out with an angle grinder (slowly and kept cooling with water) shaped them with a bench grinder (as it warms in your hand stick in water) and finished with a file. the steel can be polished easily but mine are sprayed with bright pink marking out paint so i can find them when i miss the target.




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