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Wondering about age of Peter Wright anvil


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#1 Woodie

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 09:24 PM

I'm new to this forum and to blacksmithing. I am gathering items and making a forge. Just yesterday I purchased an anvil at an auction. After getting it home I found that it was a Peter Wright. I've done some research and believe that it was made sometime around the middle of the 19th century. Could someone confirm or deny what age this anvil might be.

The anvil is marked with "Peter Wright Patent". Below it is "1 0 7" which is spread out from the left side of the base to the right side. My research shows that "1 0 7" means it is a 119 pound anvil which is fairly accurate according to my bathroom scale which shows 117.5 pounds. It does not have England or Solid Wrought written on it anywhere. The overall length is 22", 4" face width, 3 3/16" table width, 10 1/2" tall, and base is 9 3/4" x8 5/8".

I have added photos. Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance,


Woodie

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#2 Rich Hale

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 09:28 PM

See if your library has or can get a copy of anvils in america by Richard Postman...And if you put your location in this forum there may be someon clase that has a coppy.

#3 Woodie

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 09:30 PM

Thank you Rich, I live near Topeka, Kansas. I checked the local library, they do not have a copy. I will have to check later to see if they can get one. A local college may have a copy I can use.

#4 Blacksmith Jim

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 10:44 PM

Get your hands on a copy of the book. It's worth it. Based on my memory, it became a law around 1915 for items exported out of England to say England on them. So I think it would have been made prior to then. I got a copy through Inter Library Loan. Ask your local library about it. Postman is the expert on the subject.

#5 DKForge

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Posted 06 April 2009 - 08:47 PM

Woodie here is the way I understand it.

If it does not say Solid Wrought on it either in a straight line or in a circle you got a really old one (pre 1850). If it said solid wrought in a straight line it would be 1850-1860 after that it was in a circle. After 1915 they started marking "England" under the word Patent on them as RegionalChaos said above. Nice old anvil.

Edited by DKForge, 06 April 2009 - 08:48 PM.
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#6 Jeff Bly

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Posted 07 April 2009 - 06:22 PM

If you look at the feet on the front under the horn, are there numbers on each foot?
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#7 ThomasPowers

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Posted 07 April 2009 - 06:53 PM

No serial numbers on a Peter Wright as I recall. Now a Trenton or HB...
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#8 Jeff Bly

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Posted 07 April 2009 - 10:04 PM

My Peter Wright has the number 2 on both feet under the horn.

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#9 Blacksmith Jim

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Posted 07 April 2009 - 11:48 PM

Jeff, I think these tend to be a makers mark or an inspectors mark. Not so much serial numbers. But of course I could be wrong. Anvils in America has the most info I know of about it.




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